Time-saving Gardening Hacks for National Gardening Week

Last Updated on 26/04/2021 by Shannen Godwin

National Gardening Week is here! This national event, run by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS), is to raise awareness of gardening, and to encourage more people to take part in this healthy and productive outdoor activity. We’re celebrating by sharing some of the best kept gardening hacks straight from the mouths of Parker’s team members. Keep reading to discover our top 5 time-saving gardening hacks.

Cut Flower Food Hack

Are your cut flowers in need of some TLC? Instead of buying flower food for your vase displays. Simply make sure to trim the stems every few days to keep the flowers fresh, and add in a teaspoon of sugar into the vase water. The sugar will not only help increase the number and size of open flowers, but it also prolongs the vase life.

Grow your own food with leftovers

Cutting vegetables and planning on throwing the scraps away? Think again! Fresh nutritious produce can be one of the most expensive buys from the supermarket. Luckily there are ways we can reduce this cost whilst experimenting with growing our own food at home. Scraps of potato, garlic bulbs and herbs can be grown in glass jars and water and transform into brand new plants. Great for the environment and your wallet.

Garden Planning Pot Hack

Put your plants in doubled pots, and then bury them at ground level. Whenever you fancy switching up your display, just lift out the top pot and slot in a different one. 

Cooking Water Fertiliser

The next time you boil or steam some vegetables, don’t pour the water down the drain. Once the water has cooled, you can pour the vegetable water in your garden to “fertilize” your plants instead of wasting it. Not only is it cost effective and resourceful, the fertilizer it provides for your plants gives them a more stable and steady growth period. 

Self-watering Plants

Planning on being away from your garden for a while? Fill a water bottle with water, leave the cap off, and quickly turn it upside down and push it a few inches into the soil. The water will slowly seep into the soil and keep it moist. 

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Building a Sensory Garden: Manchester Mind/ J. Parkers

Last Updated on 22/04/2021 by Shannen Godwin

We are happy to announce that J. Parkers have teamed up with the local mental health charity – Manchester Mind, to fund and construct their new sensory garden.

Throughout the course of the pandemic, our customers have shared so many stories about how gardening has benefited their mental health. With mental health close to the heart of our business, we decided to collaborate with a local charity that helps support better mental health. Manchester-based mental health charity Manchester Mind, provide support and training services for those struggling with mental health, including isolation, loneliness and food poverty. After discovering the amazing mental health work MM do, we had to reach out and offer our support.

At their Chorlton-based allotment, Manchester Mind staff and volunteers have been supporting the charity’s emergency food response, which produces meals for families experiencing food poverty in Manchester. At the allotment they are growing and harvesting food, that is then prepared by the catering team and used in the emergency response meals.

One thing sorely missing from the allotment, is a space to relax. After speaking with the Manchester Mind team, they revealed their goal to build a sensory garden. The aim of the garden would be to provide space for volunteers and staff to use for reflection and for one-to-one mental health support sessions. Therefore, to help achieve this goal, J. Parkers are now proudly partnering with Manchester Mind on the funding and construction of their sensory garden.

The Starting Point

A disused area at the back of the allotment will be the setting for the brand-new sensory garden. MM envision a calming space separate from the main plot. For the build, groundwork and planting days have been set out for J. Parker’s staff and Manchester Mind volunteers throughout spring to transform the space.

The Vision

The plan is to transform the desolate, unloved space in their allotment into a beautiful garden thriving with life. A large garden area will host seating areas, a solar fountain and a variety of scented plants. Additionally, a sheltered seating area is to be created as a private space for 1/1 support sessions. The grand opening date for the garden is June 21st 2021, which will celebrate the easing of lockdown restrictions.

Manchester Mind: Sensory Garden Garden (3D design)

One of the core values of Manchester Mind is that everyone deserves to be supported in their mental health needs. This new sensory garden will help provide a safe, relaxing space, all while helping make a difference for those in need mental health support in Manchester.

We will be providing updates on this project every few weeks, so stay tuned!

To get support or find out more information on Manchester Mind, click here to visit their website.

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What is cross-pollination

Last Updated on 20/04/2021 by Esther Roberts

The question of how to cross pollinate is a common one. But before learning how to, it’s best to learn what it is. Cross-pollination is not only exclusive to bees! It is a process of transferring pollen from the anther of one flower to the stigma of another flower. Cross-pollination can be used intentionally to create unique varieties of plants and vegetables.

What is cross-pollination

When one plant pollinates another variety, the two plants genetics combine to create a new variety. This new variety shares characteristics from both plants. A popular cross-pollination is for tomatoes, to create new and better varieties. This is intentional cross-pollination but it doesn’t always happen this way. In some instances, external forces play a hand in cross-pollination, like the wind or bees, carry pollen from one variety to another.

Common cross-pollinate misconceptions

Unlike flowers, not all plants can cross-pollinate easily. Cross-pollination within vegetables is less about the pollen, and has more to do with the species. For example, a cucumber could not cross-pollinate with a tomato as they are not the same species. But, it can happen between a broccoli and cauliflower.

Secondly, that the current harvest has been affected. This isn’t possible. Cross-pollination only affects the fruit of any seeds planted from that fruit. If think your harvest looks odd then it might be worth exploring other options such as pests and diseases before jumping to conclusions.

Controlling cross-pollination

Cross-pollination can be controlled, it just requires some extra steps. The easiest method is making sure to only grow one species in the garden as cross-pollination is unlikely to happen. If you want to grow multiple varieties you should determine if the plant you are growing is self pollinated or wind and insect pollinated. You can eliminate the chance of cross-pollination by planting different varieties of the same species at least 3m apart.

Whether is it intentional or not, cross-pollination isn’t always a bad thing. Your plants remain unaffected and you might even create a new variety that grows better and stronger than ever.

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