How to make your own fruit sorbets

Last Updated on 29/06/2021 by Esther Roberts

Our sorbet recipe is fuss free, simple and sure to be a summer favourite! In a simple set of steps and a small ingredient list this desert will take you no time to make, and even less time to polish off. Using either fresh or frozen ingredients, this is an easy treat with almost limitless combinations.

Servings: 6 – 8

You will need:

  • Saucepan
  • Baking tray
  • Parchment paper
  • Blender or food processor

Ingredients:

  • 600g raspberries (or your preferred fruit
  • 300g granulated sugar
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • Mint (optional)

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Freezing time: 1 -2 hours

Instructions:

  1. Freeze fruits – Wash and dry raspberries before freezing completely on a parchment covered baking tray.
  2. Dissolve sugar – In a saucepan dissolve sugar in 280ml of water on low heat. Stir until sugar has dissolved and raise the heat to a simmer until liquid has become a syrup. Set aside for later.
  3. Blend fruits – In a blender or fruit processor, carefully pulse fruits adding sugar syrup in stages. Combine with lemon juice and blitz until smooth. Discard of any seeds.
  4. Enjoy – serve immediately with extra fruits for decoration and a sprig of mint for decoration.

Tips:

Do I have to use the sugar syrup?

  • If you’re not a fan of sweetener you can always substitute it for orange juice (or any kind of fruit juice) or even water.

Do I have to use raspberries?

  • Not at all! Although raspberry is our favourite, strawberries, blueberries and blackberries work just as well! You could even take it one step further and exchange the lime juice for other citrus fruits, lemon and orange are great additions.

Don’t get caught in the dark, our planting guides are here to help:

What to Do In the Garden In July

Last Updated on 29/06/2021 by Amber Williams

Garden jobs to do in July blog

Our gardens are full of sunshine and life, giving us the motivation to get outside and get stuff done. Let’s talk about garden jobs to do in July.

Whether you’re growing flowers, plants, fruits or vegetables, there’s plenty to do in the garden or allotment this month. Follow this quick and easy-to-do list to help you plan for the month ahead.

Deadhead Spent Perennials

Deadheading echinacea flowers - garden jobs to do in July

Sometimes your blooms need a bit of help and encouragement to help them look their best. Deadheading spent flowers will allow them to produce new buds, keeping your display looking fresher for longer! Deadhead your flowers whenever they need it, cutting just below the flower head.

Protect Your Fruit from Pests

Adding mesh to protect strawberries

As exciting as it is to grow your own fruits and vegetables in the garden or allotment, they can also be a pain to protect against pests. As fruits like Strawberries start to appear this month, it might be a good idea to cover them with mesh. This will stop animals like squirrels and birds from getting at them!

Feed your Chillies, Cucumbers and Tomatoes Regularly

Add tomato fertilizer to vegetables like tomatoes, chilies and cucumbers.

To keep your cucumbers, chillies and tomatoes bursting with life, it’s a great idea to add some high potash tomato fertiliser every week to two weeks.

Keep Up With Composting

Turning the compost heap is another important garden jobs to do in July

Turn the contents of your compost bin. Leaving it to its own devices can take longer to create your compost, so a regular turn and stir will help the oxygen move through the pile and quicken the process.

More Garden Jobs to do in July

  • Mow your lawn regularly, if needed
  • Water your hanging baskets and containers every day, either in the early morning or evening to help preserve water
  • Deadhead bedding blooms
  • Keep an eye out for pests regularly on your plants
  • Start to think about ordering spring plants and blooms for autumn delivery

Read more from J Parker’s

Eton mess recipe
When is too late to plant summer flowering plants?

What to Plant in July

Last Updated on 29/06/2021 by Esther Roberts

Summer is truly upon us! As the weather and soil warm up, now is the perfect time to get those Autumn flowering bulbs into the ground. Move that BBQ, rearrange that patio furniture and make space in those beds, a new growing season is upon us. From gorgeous Crocus to delicious berries (that go great in an Eton Mess!), it’s time to get stuck in.

Here is what you can plant this July.

Autumn Flowering Crocus

Don’t let your garden fade away, keep up the momentum with our Autumn Flowering Crocus range! They look especially beautiful when planted  in groups at the front of a border or in patio pots and containers alongside evergreen foliage. Supplied as top quality bulbs and corms, don’t leave your Autumn garden until too late.

Crocus Sativus (Saffron)
Crocus Autumn Flowering Mixed

Indoor Flowering Amaryllis

Bring the garden indoors with our Indoor Flowering Amaryllis bulbs. With a large assortment of collections, styles and colours to choose from, they’re an easy way to bring some of that garden magic indoors. When planted in fresh loam or compost, watch your flowers bloom in a beautiful display of colour.

Amaryllis Adele 34cm+
Amaryllis Alfresco 26cm+

Goji Berry

If you’re looking to start that new healthy lifestyle, Goji Berries are the one for you! High in vitamins and antioxidants, along with delicious little berries, this bush will produce beautiful purple/white flowers that bloom through summer encouraging pollinators such as butterflies into the garden.

Goji Berry (Lycium Barbarum)

Blueberries

Known as a modern day super food for it’s great source of Vitamin C, Blueberries are one of the UK’s most popular fruits! Whether you love it for the incredible health benefits or it’s subtly sweet taste, Blueberries are easy to plant and even easier to care for and once picked off the branch can be used in a wide range of ways.

Blueberry – All Season Collection
Blueberry Pink Lemonade

Tayberry

This marvellous mixture of a raspberry and blackberry is the size of a big raspberry with the sweetness and juice of a blackberry. Growing to the size of a large strawberry, the Tayberry is much more restrained than a blackberry and can be safely controlled. Don’t forget to prune back in winter!

Tayberry Madana

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The Manchester Mind Therapy Garden is Now Open

Last Updated on 29/06/2021 by Shannen Godwin

After a hard 6 months of planning and building, the Manchester Mind therapy garden is now finally open! Based at the charity’s allotment in Chorlton, the therapy garden is now a peaceful, relaxing space for the charity volunteers and staff to enjoy.

After partnering together on this project at the start of 2021, the charity volunteers and members of the J. Parker’s team have worked tirelessly over the past few months bringing this garden to life. As the charity work hard producing kilos of fruit and vegetables at their allotment, this new relaxation space is now the perfect spot for workers and visitors to relax, and the new enclosed area will be used for 1/1 support sessions.

The enclosed area

The enclosed area features a large wooden gazebo which shelters two large wooden benches. This area is now a isolated area, separated from the open garden by a wall of bamboo, to help provide more space for 1/1 therapy support sessions.

Walkway to the enclosed area

The open garden

The open garden now features two wooden arbours, a garden arch, trough planters and a solar fountain. This space is now the perfect spot for volunteers and staff to socialise and relax after a hard day at the allotment.

Solar fountain and arbour in the open garden area

J. Parker’s will be continuing their relationship with Manchester Mind, so keep your eye out for new projects coming soon!

For more information about Manchester Mind and their services, please visit their website here.