When to Plant Begonias

Begonias are a summer staple, bringing a plethora of colourful flowers to the garden all season long. Their bright blooms and easy to grow nature is exactly why the species is so beloved by gardener’s across the country.

However, knowing when, how, or where to plant Begonias can be a confusing task – especially for those new to gardening! Follow our guide to effortlessly grow your Begonias for the summer season.

When to Plant

Plant Begonias in early spring, once the threat of frosts has disappeared. Begonias aren’t a hardy plant, and can be damaged by cold weather.


More specifically, March and April are the best months to plant your Begonias, as there is less chance of frosts to appear.

How to Plant

Planting Begonias is an easy enough task. Most Begonias are supplied in a tuberous form, which are similar to bulbs in the way that they should be planted.


Plant your tubers in seed trays in March or April. Fill trays with moist potting compost, and place the tuber inside around 3cm deep and spaced apart 3cm. Once sprouting leaves, move into individual pots and harden off when all danger of frost has passed.

Where to Plant

Begonias can provide masses of blooms around the garden, regardless of where planted. They prefer sunny conditions, so take this into account when finding the perfect spot.


I’ts helpful to note that Begonias don’t like overly-damp conditions, and will rot if kept too moist. Whether you plant them in hanging baskets, patio pots, or simply in the border, your Begonias will thrive.

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New introductions for Spring 2021

From dazzling dahlias to statuesque gladioli, in 2021 we have added dozens of new introductions to our spring range. To help you plan your summer displays this year, check out some of our new spring favourites.

Dahlias

Dahlia Hartenaas

Dahlia Hartenaas is a beautiful pink Collarette variety that blooms from July all the way until the first frost. A great pick for borders, containers or cut flowers.

Dahlia Pulp Fiction

There is nothing fictional about the beauty of this new dark-leaf dahlia. Producing beautiful scarlet florets, plant this stunning dahlia in beds, borders or containers.

Dahlia Crème De Cassis

This romantic decorative dahlia showcases magical pale lilac petals with deep purple centres. Perfect for cut flower fans!

Gladioli

Gladioli Amber Mistique

A stunning cream gladioli with violet centres. Ideal for cutting, this beautiful new sword-lily deserves a prime spot in beds, borders and containers.

Gladioli Lumiere

A flower that packs a punch. This large-flowering gladioli boasts the most vibrant plum purple and pink blooms. Perfect for cut flowers or bouquets.

Gladioli Lemonlicious

A statuesque gladioli that will brighten up any garden. These pastel yellow flowers with deep yellow centres are perfect for the back of a border or as cut flowers.

Cannas

Canna Semaphore

An exotic, easy to grow perennial. The bright yellow flowers of Canna semaphore will add plenty of colour to your summer containers.

Canna Triomphe

Stunning scarlet red blooms. This low maintenance perennial is not only stunning, but is a favourite amongst pollinators.

Canna Angelique

Stunning salmon pink blooms against a dark purple foliage. Canna Angelique is an excellent perennial that will add an exotic touch to beds and borders.

Lilies

Lilium Levi

A romantic Asiatic lily with delicate pink and white flowers. A lively lily which will look amazing in borders or planted in patio containers.

Lilium Martagon Purple Morning

This fragrant pale pink lily produces glossy petals on tall, erect stems. Ideal for summer landscapes, and perfect for cut flowers.

Lilium Tribal Kiss

An Asiatic lily that makes the perfect plant for adding exotic beauty to the back of a border. Boasting white flowers with violet centres, this amazing lily makes the most beautiful cut flowers.

Dahlia flowers for every garden

cactus dahlias

One of the most beautifully versatile summer flowers. Blooming from summer into autumn, the colourful, long-lasting blooms of dahlias belong in every garden. Varying in size, colour and shape, discover our guide for choosing the best dahlia flowers for your garden.

For pots/containers

For pots and containers, the best choices are the shorter, dwarf varieties. With a more compact shape and low growing habit, dwarf dahlias provide beautiful bright coloured blooms at a smaller size, making the perfect companions for patio pots, containers, especially if you’re short of space in the garden.

For flower beds and borders

If you are passionate about vibrant summer colour in your flower beds and borders, dahlia flowers are the perfect solution. For the front of the border, low-growing dwarf dahlias or pollinator-loving mignon dahlias are the perfect options, and to get impressive blooms at the back of a border, dinnerplate and decorative dahlias are ideal due to their height and colourful flowerheads.

For cut flower beds

All dahlias can make exceptional cut flowers but narrowed down a list of the most desirable and popular types. Pompom dahlias work well for cutting. Their natural habit is to continually produce flowers as they go through the season. Waterlily types are also a great choice as they are free flowering, normally held on long stems, and any of the miniatures will make perfect cut flowers.

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How to Start an Allotment

Have you ever thought about growing your own fruit and vegetables but lack the space in your own garden? Find out all you need to know about how to start an allotment from scratch along with our beginner planting suggestions.

How to start an allotment:

  1. Plan your plot

If there is no space for crops in your garden, contact your local council on allotment opportunities in your area. Once get your allotment, go for a plot size suited to your needs – half a plot is adequate for most people and ideal for beginners. Here are some initial plot planning steps:

  • Decide what style of vegetable beds you’d like
  • Decide what size of beds you’d like.
  • Make sure you include space for sheds / greenhouses / compost bins / water butts etc.
  • Make sure you consider where you’ll place trees, fruiting bushes, and other perennial (stay in the in the ground year on year) plants.

2. Weed maintenance

The biggest burden of an allotment owner…the weeds, and most allotments need continual hoeing and weeding. When prepping a plot, once you’ve cleared the weeds, dig the soil and remove weed roots. It’s worth investing in a push hoe and a draw hoe to be fully prepared for any weed problems.

  • Potatoes smother weeds, so plant them in the weediest areas.
  • Perennial crops such as fruit need no cultivation, but must be planted in areas that are clear of all perennial weeds.

3. Soil conditions

Once you get out all the roots of the weeds. Compost their foliage, and drown the roots in a bucket of water for 2 months (then you can add them to a compost heap). Turn a layer of compost into the first 5 –10cms of the soil and you are ready to plant!

Beginner plants for allotments:

Here’s our selection of plants for allotment beginners:

Allotment seasonal guide:

Winter ❄

In late winter, rains should have restored the soil to full moisture levels, if they have not left it soggy, battered and emptied of nutrients. You can get some crops off to a good start, although on difficult clay soils transplants raised indoors might be necessary.

Spring 🌸

Getting plants going well before late spring is essential. Crops grow best during the long, warm days and sunshine of late spring to late summer.

Summer ☀

Wet, but not too wet, summers are far better for allotments than hot, dry ones; crops need water to grow.

Autumn 🍂

By autumn, growth is tailing off in lower light levels, so little rain is needed; warm, dry weather is better for ripening produce now. Beware of wet weather that can lead to rots and unripe produce that won’t store well.

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What to Do in The Garden in January

Although January is still a wintry month, there’s still lots you can get up to in the garden. From pruning to planting, there’s no shortage of work regardless of the cold weather!

With spring approaching, you may be conscious of how to get your garden ready in time. We’ve compiled this handy list of gardening jobs to do throughout January to prepare your garden for spring.

Damaged Plants

Now is the perfect time to throw away damaged and rotted plants to make way for new ones come spring. This can also be helpful as it will allow you to think ahead and decide what you need to order before spring begins, such as new plants or shrubs.

Move Your Strawberry Plants

January is the best time to move your strawberry plants indoors or in a greenhouse as it promotes early fruiting. You may have already moved your potted plants into your greenhouse before winter began, but if not then around now is the best time to get them under shelter.

Bird Box Maintenance

January is a great time to survey your bird boxes and make sure they’re not wobbly or need maintenance before the nesting season begins. If you don’t have any bird boxes around the garden and you’d like to add one before spring, find a nice sheltered spot in a tree or bush.

More Jobs for the January Garden:

  • Remove any weeds from your beds and borders, especially before planting new plants.
  • Throw away damaged pots and buy new ones before the season starts.
  • Top up bird baths regularly and defrost frozen water with warm water in the mornings or throughout the day.
  • Inspect plants for rot and throw away any if necessary.
  • Prune your pear and apple trees to remove dead or damaged branches before spring.

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5 Ways to Plan for Next Year’s Garden

Part of the fun of having a garden is planning how it’ll look throughout the year. Whether you’re new to gardening and you have a clean slate, or you’re a pro gardener looking for a change, there’s plenty of ways to update your garden.

The best time to plan your new garden is in the New Year, when most of your garden is dormant. Follow these easy steps to help you discover your dream garden for 2021.

Write Your Wish list

Whether it’s spring blooms, summer colours or autumn beauties, there’s plenty of plants and flowers to choose from. Maybe you have some favourites in mind, which can help you to choose complimentary blooms and therefore completing your bedding display. Or perhaps you’re looking to decorate your patio with more colour and variety. Make a list of everything you’d like to grow and keep it in mind when picking your plants and flowers in Spring.

Plan Your Next Move

Next, it’s good to take note of how much space you have to play with. For example, urban gardens tend to have less space, but can be transformed with help from climbing clematis and patio containers filled to the brim with plants and flowers. Determine what space you have and how you would like to fill it before buying your plants.

Pick your Theme

Choosing a theme for your garden can help you decide on what you’d like to plant and when. For example, cottage-themed gardens focus on spring and summer blooms such as alliums, cyclamen, geraniums, begonias and gladioli. Once you decide on your theme, everything else should fall into place!

Order Your Plants and Blooms

Now that you’ve decided on what and where, it’s time to decide on when. As in, when should you start ordering your plants? Well, depending on which season you’re planning for, you’ll have certain restrictions. If you’re planning your spring garden, you should order your bulbs and plants in autumn and winter to ensure they arrive on time and don’t spoil before planting.

Your Planting Plan

And finally, you should think about when to plant your seasonal displays. Every plant will have different requirements, and it’s important to understand when and why you should plant them at certain times of the year. If you’re a seasoned gardener (excuse the pun), then you’ll be familiar with when plants should be put in the ground.

However, if you’re new to gardening, then planting seasons will be a new concept! When buying your plants, you can find growing instructions on the product page. This will tell you when and how to grow your plants.

Shop Our Brand New Spring 2021 Range

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When to Plant Your Gladioli Bulbs

Often known as ‘Sword Lilies’, Gladioli bulbs are a favourite summer bulb among gardener’s and it’s easy to see why! Their mix of vibrant colours and scents are two among many reasons why this bulb is perfect for decorating your garden borders.

If you’re new to gardening, you might be wondering when to plant Gladioli bulbs. Luckily enough, you’re in the right place to find out exactly how and when to get your beautiful bulbs in the ground.

When to Plant Your Bulbs

Gladiolus is a native South-African bulb that produces the best blooms in sunny and warm conditions. Like any summer bulb, it’s best to plant them in spring after the danger of frost has disappeared.

How to Plant Your Bulbs

Planting Gladioli bulbs is an easy task, perfect for beginners. Plant a group of 6-8 bulbs in a nicely dug hole that’s roughly twice the depth of the bulbs themselves and spaced a bulb’s width apart.

Now that you know how and when to plant Gladioli bulbs, you can watch your summer garden grow swathes of beautiful blooms all season long.

To care for your gladioli bulbs, water plentifully throughout its flowering season and use tomato feed or comfrey feed every 2-3 weeks to promote healthy growth. Lift in autumn or early winter and store for the following summer.

Perfect Companions

Not sure what to pair with your Gladioli bulbs? Here’s just a few of our favourite summer-interest flowers that are perfect companions to gladioli. Decorate your summer garden colour and beauty with the help from Dahlias, Peonies, and Alliums.

Dahlia Painted Collection
Allium Superglobe Mixed
Peony Top Brass

Creating a Wildlife-Friendly Garden

Many of us may think that to create a wildlife-friendly garden comes a lot of extra effort and money. Well, that’s not always the case! You can make the smallest of changes to your garden to make a big difference to animals and critters around you.

If you’re looking to make some changes to your gardens to make them more hospitable, here are some easy options.

Safe Shelters

All types of wildlife need a safe haven to rest and even breed. By including some simple shelters in your garden, you’re helping them to recuperate and recharge. An essential for all walks of life. Not only could this be bird shelters, but you could even buy or make shelters for hedgehogs and bats.

Shrubs and trees also make wonderful homes for all kinds of wildlife, as their bushy nature provides a veil of sorts away from predators.

Hospitable Habitats

Offering different habitats for wildlife alike is achievable in any garden, regardless of size or budget. You could offer plenty of habitats for a wide range of wildlife without even knowing it.

Flower borders offer nectar for pollinators such as bees and butterflies, whereas uncut and long grass houses lots of critters and crawlers. Trees and shrubs offer homes to plenty of animals like birds and squirrels, and ponds are the perfect breeding ground for toads and frogs.

Feeding Stations

If they nest and sleep there, then it makes sense to help them with nourishment also. Small changes like putting up bird feeders can make a whole world of difference. Berry bushes and flowers can also help feed insects and animals.

Sustainable Changes

And lastly, making small changes to be more green and eco-friendly not only helps wildlife to continue to thrive in their natural habitats, but it makes our world just that bit better and brighter. Things like composting off-cuts of food from the kitchen and old hedge trimmings can make an all-natural compost, perfect for growing your seasonal blooms.

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Garden Trends for 2021

I think we all want some change in 2021. Gardeners are always actively working to make the garden more beautiful, mainly with relaxation and fun as the goal. If you fancy giving your garden some TLC in the new year, have a look at our top garden trends for 2021 and get inspired.

Garden Trends: Colour Schemes

Comforting Neutrals

With more of us spending a lot of time at home, 2021 will be a year of creating cocooning, cosy spaces. Dulux have announced that their ‘Colour of the Year’ for 2021 is “Brave Ground”; a warm neutral. So, why not use the trendy colours designed for the home in the garden? Creams and warm neutrals are the perfect colours for creating restful and relaxing flower displays that bring a sense of comfort to your outdoor space.

For trailing trellises and walls, we recommend an elegant creamy rose, or warm pastel begonias for your summer borders and pots.

Rich Reds

We predict that 2021 will steer towards the warmer tones of reds and plum. These rich saturated hues are effortlessly chic and will make for dramatic and luxurious flower beds and borders. There are so many ravishing red dahlias to choose from that are perfect for borders and for cut flower gardens.

Garden trends: Garden Styles

Balcony gardens

Since one in eight households (12%) in Great Britain has no access to a private or shared gardens according to ONS, British city-dwellers are getting more inventive with ways to grow plants. Growing potted plants on balconies is a great way for those living in a block of flats or a high rise building to enjoy a small piece of nature at home.

Windowsill gardening also a great way for growing plants in small spaces; grow herbs to add a little something extra to your cooking or fill them with colourful flowers. You might not have a big, sprawling space, but that doesn’t mean you can’t grow fresh plants and flowers!

Raised beds

Raised bed gardening has grown in popularity, and it’s easy to see why. Gardening in raised beds has endless possibilities and so many benefits.

  • Fewer weeds
  • Easier for those with mobility issues
  • Better water retention in areas that have super-sandy soil
  • Better drainage in areas with clay soils
  • More growing space
  • No soil compaction from foot tread
  • Warmer soil earlier in the season
  • Warmer soil for a longer season
Cottage gardens

Classic styles always stay on trend. The very familiar and popular modern-day concept of cottage gardening dates all the way back to the 14th century during Elizabethan times. If you’re looking to achieve this stunning, traditional style at home, consider planting roses, foxgloves, alliums, poppies, and delphiniums.

Grow your own produce

‘Grow your own’ has been one of the biggest growing garden trends over the past few years, but with so many of us looking for new hobbies to keep us occupied over lockdown, growing fruit and veg has become more popular than ever. For those looking to pick up the trend, dwarf fruit trees and rhubarb are perfect for growing produce in any sized space.

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New Gladioli for Summer 2021

Native to the Mediterranean and prized for their majestic flower spikes, Gladiolus (Sword-Lilies) are one of the most treasured flowers in the summer garden. Whether used in borders, containers or as cut flowers, these easy to grow blooms always provide a spectacular effect. Blooming in late-spring to early summer, these beauties can grow up to 2-3 feet tall. Discover the new additions to our Gladioli range for your 2021 garden.

Gladioli Amber Mystique

A striking, bi-coloured plants. Gladiolus ‘Amber Mystique’ is a creamy white Gladioli with contrasting lilac throats. Ideal for planting in summer borders.

Gladiolus Circus Club

A sight for sore eyes, with white backgrounds, purple edging, yellow centres and maroon eyes. While taking little space to grow, they combine so well with other plants. They make striking cut flowers too.

Gladiolus Fergie

Add a whimsical finish to your summer borders with gladiolus ‘fergie’. Ideal for borders and pots. Their vivid lime-green flowers will bring an exotic look to garden displays.

Gladiolus June

Warm up your summer garden with the sunny gladiolus ‘June’. June is a delightful orange and yellow butterfly Gladioli variety; guaranteed to brighten up any garden.

Gladiolus Nanus Nathalie

Nathalie is an elegant light pink nanus gladiolus. Their pretty pink petals contrast against the deep throat markings. This ever popular variety looks perfect planted in groups, and they also make beautiful cut flowers.

Click the image below to browse our full range of Gladioli bulbs. Available to pre-order now for delivery from mid-January.

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