What to Plant with Roses

Roses are enchanting flowers, enticing the appraisal from everyone around them. However, roses do not have an extensive flowering season, which can make your garden look a bit bare even in the height of spring and summer. With that in mind, it’s always a good idea to combine your roses with a collection of other flowers that compliment and enhance the appearance of your garden, but won’t take away the main stage if the roses are the focus.

We’ve taken the liberty of picking our favourite companions that will look beautiful alongside your roses through the height of their flowering season and will add that extra bit of colour once your roses start to dwindle at the end of their run.

Alliums

Alliums are perfect for adding height to your garden. You can partner these with any of your roses to create a cottage garden theme.

Shop Our Alliums

Allium White Cloud
Allium Pink Jewel

Foxgloves

Foxgloves are beautiful and capture that British garden aesthetic that many gardeners strive for. With their tall flower heads and strong stems, they’re a brilliant addition to your rose garden.

Shop Our Foxgloves

Digitalis Hardy Mixed
Digitalis Hardy Snow Thimble

Lavender

Lavender are great pollinators, which makes them an essential flower to any garden throughout spring and summer. Plant in your beds and borders for a classic companion look.

Shop our Lavender

Dwarf Lavender Munstead
Lavender Rosea

Verbascums

Similar to the Foxglove, Verbascums are a quintessentially British flower that is often found in many cottage-styled gardens. Pair with any rose plant for an exceptional display!

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Verbascum Rosetta
Verbascum phoeniceum Mixed

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Cozy Apple Crumble Recipe

home-made apple crumble

The quintessentially British apple crumble is the way to many of our hearts and is an absolute MUST for the colder autumn months. Now that many of our apple trees have produced lovely, juicy apples, it’s time to put them to work!
With that in mind, we brainstormed our favourite apple-centred recipes, and we all agreed; you can’t go wrong with the classic crumble.

Perfect for rainy days and family dinners, this apple crumble recipe will have everyone begging for seconds!

Serves: 4
Prep time: 1 Hour

Ingredients

The Filling:

– 3 Medium Apples (either from your garden or bought). Peeled, cored, and sliced.
– 2 TBSP of Caster Sugar (use 1 TBSP if you’d like it less sweet)
– 1 TBSP of Cinnamon

The Crumble:

– 175g Plain Flower
– 110g Golden Caster Sugar
– 110g butter

The Finish:

– 1 TBSP of Rolled Oats
– 1 TBSP of Demerara Sugar
Cream, custard, or ice cream to serve

Method

Step 1
Heat your oven to 190C/ 170 fan/ gas 5

Step 2
Toss the sliced apples with 2 tbsp of Golden Caster Sugar and 1 tbsp of cinnamon. Transfer the coated apples into a dish that is approx 5cm deep. Press down on the apples so you can barely see the bottom of the dish (we’re avoiding big holes for the crumble to fall into).

Step 3
Put your plain flour and the rest of the caster sugar into a bowl and add a pinch of salt.

Step 4
Add your butter to the bowl and combine the ingredients by rubbing them together with your fingertips. Do this until the mixture starts to look like soft breadcrumbs. If you’d prefer, you can put the mixture into a processor until the mixture looks sandy. Make sure you don’t over pulse!

Step 5
Pour the mixture over your apples in the baking dish and spread it out so it covers the apples evenly. You can do this with a flat spoon.

Step 6
Get a fork and press the mixture down so the crumble becomes compact and crisp.

Step 7 (optional)
Sprinkle with your oats and Dermerara sugar.

Step 8
Place your dish into the oven once it has pre-heated and leave in for 34-40 minutes. It should be golden on top and the apples inside should be soft. You can check this with a fork.

Leave to cool and cover with your favourite topping to enjoy!

Read Some of Our Other Blogs…

What to do in the Garden in September

September has arrived and the evenings are starting to get darker and cooler, so what can you do in the garden this month? From planting bulbs to harvesting tasty produce, here are our top activities to look forward to in the garden this September.

Divide perennials

Divide perennials to maintain healthy growth and grow even more plants. Simply lift them out with a garden fork, pull the plant apart gently, and then replant the new clumps.

Plant shrubs and trees

Autumn is a great time to plant evergreen shrubs and trees, whilst the soil is still moist and warm and the plants can get used to their new position before winter hits.

Start harvesting apples

With crops reaching their peak in September, early harvest apples will become ready for picking. Simply pick an apple, give the stem a twist, and if the stem comes away easily, it’s ready for eating!

Snip flowers and foliage

Late summer blooms will still be looking luscious, and are perfect for adding colour into the home. Cut Dahlia, Aster, and Crocosmia flowers and pair alongside Pyracantha berries for a beautiful display!

Get ready for bulb planting

The end of September celebrates the start of bulb planting season, so order your early spring flowering favourites that you can begin planting in September.

New Tulip Bulbs for Spring

Wild Tulip Flowers

As we prepare for the autumn months, we try to think ahead and plan out what we need to do in the garden before the weather becomes too wet and miserable. This includes thinking about how we want our gardens to look come spring.

Luckily, we’ve just dropped brand new tulip products to help you plan your spring garden as efficiently as possible! We’ve added new tulips to all our categories, allowing you an easy pick depending on your garden’s theme.

Darwin Hybrid Tulips

Darwin Hybrid Tulips

Originating in the Netherlands, the Darwin Hybrid Tulip is a great pick if you’re looking for bright colours and sturdy foliage.

New Darwin Tulips

Darwin Apricot Impression tulips
Apricot Impression
Rare Darwin Tulip Collection
Rare Darwin Tulip Collection
Fosteriana Tulips

Fosteriana Tulips

Fosteriana tulips are regaled for their wildflower nature, making them the perfect pick for those with a more naturally occurring garden theme.

New Fosteriana Bulbs

Fosteriana Orange Emperor tulips
Orange Emperor
Exotic Emperor tulips
Exotic Emperor
Greigii tulips

Greigii & Kaufmanniana Tulips

These tulips are unique in their range of colours. Providing you with attractive blooms throughout spring, these bulbs are a great addition to any British garden.

New Greigii and Kaufmanniana Bulbs

Kaufmanniana Giuseppe Verdi tulips
Kaufmanniana Giuseppe Verdi
Greigii Haute Couture tulips
Greigii Haute Couture
Lily flowering tulips

Lily Flowering

Often known as the ‘Fluted Tulip’, these blooms are popular for their flared flower heads. Coming in bright colours, this bulb will attract all sorts of attention to your garden through spring.

New Lily Flowering Tulips

Lily flowering fire wings
Tulip Fire Wings
Lily flowering Tres Chic
Tulip Tres Chic
Single early tulips

Single Early Tulips

Single Early’s are traditional dwarf growing tulips. This makes them perfect for smaller gardens, as they look wonderful planted in patio pots.

New Single Early Tulips

Single Early Pink Prince tulip
Tulip Pink Prince
Single Early Ravana tulip
Tulip Ravana
Triumph tulips

Triumph Tulips

As a result of a mix between two premium varieties, the Triumph was born. Known for their outstanding colours and unique shape. Perfect for your beds, borders, or even containers.

New Triumph Tulips

Triumph Affaire tulips
Tulip Affaire
Triumph Grand Perfection tulip
Tulip Grand Perfection

Check Out Some of Our Other Blogs:

What Bulbs to Plant in September

Easy to grow and extremely versatile, flower bulbs are a blessing for gardeners. With autumn-planting season just around the corner, discover what bulbs to plant in September and grow your very own spring garden paradise.

Daffodils

September is the perfect month for popping your Daffodil bulbs in the ground. These cheery, versatile flowers are easy to grow, bloom from March onwards and look great in pots, borders or naturalising in the grass. Perfect for any amateur and experienced gardener.

Daffodil ‘Golden Ducat
Daffodil and Narcissi Mixed

Crocus

Plant a carpet of jewel-like flowers for spring with Crocus bulbs. Easy to grow and perfect for naturalising under trees, shrubs and in lawns, fill your garden with these popular spring flowers. These delightful early spring flowers bloom from February into March.

Crocus Grand Maitre
Winter Crocus Species Mixed

Muscari

Compact plants that truly pack a punch. Easy to grow and bursting with vibrant colour, Muscari is the perfect plant for any garden. Flowering from March into April, plant them alone in pots and borders for a clustered look or pair them alongside Tulips and Daffodils to add a pop of colour to your spring displays.

Muscari Armeniacum
Muscari Cupido

Hyacinths

With rich colours and a heavenly fragrance, September is the perfect time to plant Hyacinths for March/April flowers. Plant them where you can enjoy their gorgeous scent: around walkways, in borders or on a patio.

Hyacinth Jan Bos
Hyacinth Miss Saigon

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New Pansy Introductions for Winter and Spring!

Our team has been working hard behind the scenes here at J Parker’s, finding us new products to add to our 2021 catalogue. With that being said, we would like to introduce our brand-new pansy flowers that have been recently added to our website.

Pansies are the perfect winter and spring bedding flower, highly respected for their hardiness throughout the colder months. With their signature pops of colour, they will perform great in your beds, borders, containers and hanging baskets! Take a sneaky peek at our new additions.

Winter Pansy Flower Collection

Winter Flowering Pansy Collection

Including 33 bulbs of each flower: Ocean Breeze mix, Autumn Blaze mix, Raspberry Sundae mix, and orange and lemons mix.

Pansy Britannia Mix

These beautiful large flowering pansies will brighten any garden with their red, white and blue petals.

Pansy Cool Wave Frost

Their powder blue petals will compliment any bed or container. Will flower from late winter into early spring.

Pansy Cool Wave Lemon

This flower is a gardener’s dream, producing attractive lemon yellow petals. Are lightly scented and perform well in any bed, border or container.

Pansy Flower Cool Wave Purple

Pansy Cool Wave Purple

This eye-catching deep purple bloom will compliment any garden. Perfect for hanging baskets or containers and will last throughout the colder months.

Pansy Cool Wave Strawberry Swirl

Producing an amazing display of pinkish-red and lemon coloured flowers, the Strawberry Swirl will brighten any space.

Pansy Morpheus

This modern pansy flower produces large royal blue and bright yellow petals. Will live happily in any bed, border or patio container.

Pansy Flower Orange and Lemons Mixed

Orange & Lemons Mixed

This vibrant pansy mix offers yellow, orange, and white blooms. Pair with any other winter flowering pansy to create the perfect display.

Trailing Pansy Raspberry Swirl

This deep maroon and white speckled flower will be the focal point of any garden. Flowering in winter, this pansy will compliment your arrangements wonderfully.

Pansy Cool Wave White

Producing a brilliant white pansy flower with a complimentary yellow center, the Cool Wave White will thrive in your winter display.

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What to Grow in a North Facing Garden

North facing cottage garden

Planting in north facing garden can be a real struggle. Since these gardens usually in shade for most of the day, it’s important to learn about which plants will be able to thrive in a north facing garden.

Keep reading to discover our selection of plants that will prosper in any environment with little sunshine.

Is my garden north facing?

To find out if you have a north facing garden, you need to find out the aspect of your garden – the direction that it faces. You can find this out one of two ways:

  • Go to your front door and open the compass app on your phone. With your phone facing forward, read the direction that the compass is measuring. If the reading is between 270° and 90°, your house is northfacing.
  • Simply by standing in the garden and looking where the sun is.

1. Hostas

Hostas

Hostas are versatile and well-loved foliage plants. This family of plants thrive in shade, so they are perfect for gardens that don’t receive much sunlight. Ideal plants for pots or borders.

Our top picks:

Hosta So Sweet
Hosta Collection

2. Snowdrops

Woodland plants are perfect for north facing gardens. Since woodland native plants are adapted to surviving in dark, damp areas, plants such as beautiful Snowdrops are a perfect shade-loving plant for spring.

Our top picks:

Double flowering Snowdrops
Russian Snowdrops

3. Ivy

The fast growing and reliable nature of Ivy, make them the perfect climbing plants for any north facing walls or fences. Available in a range of green, red and yellow tones, they are the perfect leafy climbers to brighten up dark spaces.

Our top picks:

Boston ivy
Boston Ivy
Virginia Creeper ivy
Virginia Creeper

4. Euonymus

One of the best things about these ultra-reliable shrubs is that they’re so easy to grow. Perfect for creating hedging or for growing in pots for a modern look. Euonymus tolerate most soils and almost any amount of sun.

Our top picks:

Euonymus Goldy
Euonymus Alatus

Check out some of our other blogs:

What to Do in the Garden in August

Echinacea (coneflowers)

August is an amazing time in the garden. Since summer brings an explosion of summer-flowering bulbs and perennials, you can see an assortment of colours and shapes in bloom everywhere.

While the August garden is the perfect time to put your feet up and enjoy all your hard work, don’t forget about the essential gardening jobs that need to be done to keep your garden in the best shape possible.

1. Hydrate your Plants

In the peak of summer, heat and humidity levels are high so make sure to water your plants when needed.

Tip: The best time to water your plants is in the early morning or late evening.

2. Keep an Eye Out for Diseases

Stay vigilant with your plant care as high temperatures can lead to plant diseases, such as brown patches and mould. Keep an eye out for black spots on your Roses and pests like snails and slugs on your plants.

3. Prune Perennials and Climbers

Cut back perennials that are overgrown or have wilted flowers to tidy up their shape. Prune Wisteria and climbing shrubs such as climbing Roses, once they have finished flowering.

4. Tomato Care

tomatoes

While your Tomatoes are growing, remove the lower leaves from the plant to help reduce the risk of disease. By removing these low growing leaves, the rest of the leaves have more space to enjoy the sun rays.

5. Plan for Bulb Planting Season

Now is the perfect time to start planning your spring 2021 garden. From amazing Tulips to delicate Daffodils, our extensive range of autumn-planting bulbs is available online for dispatch from mid-September.

Want to WIN a £50 bulb bundle? Enter our August competition!

How Much Value Does a Garden add to a Property?

House garden

The housing market is quickly rebounding post-lockdown, with house sales running 28% above pre-lockdown levels according to the latest Zoopla House Price Index, and the need for outdoor space has come a popular trend for buyers and renters.

The Office for National Statistic suggests that around 1.7 million people have been working mainly from home during lockdown, and since many people have not had the luxury of escaping into a garden, there is now a surge in people looking to move out of the city to more rural areas and get closer to nature. According to Rightmove, rental searches for gardens were up 16% this June compared to the average seen in January and February, which shows that the need for outdoor spaces has become an important factor for many people looking to move home.

Does a Garden add Value to a Property?

According to PropertyPriceAdvice, the potential value of a garden on property value can be up to 10%. Whether your property has a garden, decking or just a patio, with some simple maintenance you can transform your outdoor space into an asset for your property.

How can I add value with my garden?

According to new research from Post Office Money, landscaping your garden could increase your property value by 77%. So to help grab attention from potential buyers, here are some simple home improvements to upgrade your garden

1. Cut the grass

A simple, freshly cut lawn is a great way to make a good first impression with potential buyers. Since the lawn is the first thing anyone sees when stepping on to a property,  a tidy, well maintained lawn gives the impression that the whole home is maintained.

2. Potted plants

potted plants in the garden

Versatile and mobile, potted plants are great for giving any garden a face-lift.  Give your garden a fresh and presentable look for showing with bright, fresh flowers like white Tulips in the springtime, or grow modern foliage Hostas for summer pots.

3. Weeding

Weeding plants

When showing a garden, presentation is a priority. Make sure to clean up the garden by tidying up and pulling out any pesky weeds to keep your garden looking its best.

4. Create garden zones

Garden seating area

If you have enough outdoor space, why not create some secluded zones to add a unique touch to your garden. By adding a garden shed or throwing up an outdoor screen to create a seating area, you can transform a standard garden into an interesting space for relaxation and entertainment.

5. Keep it Simple

Fern plant

According to Garden Design, low maintenance plants have become a big trend in 2020, especially foliage plants. Plants like Heucheras and Ferns are ideal for amateur and experienced gardeners alike as they require very little maintenance, as well as less watering and pruning than other plants.

When to Plant Crocus

The jewel-like tones of Crocus flowers are just one of the many reasons why these plants are loved by gardeners. Autumn crocus add a rainbow of colour to the garden as summer flowers start to fade, and Spring Crocus are one of the earliest plants to flower in late Winter. Since Autumn Crocus and Spring Crocus bloom during different seasons in the year, these corms need to be planted at their correct times. 

Discover exactly when and how to plant Crocus corms and fill your garden with stunning Crocus flowers for most of the year.

What are Crocus corms?

Corms are very similar to bulbs, but corms are specialised sections of the stem. The appearance of corms differs from bulbs as corms tend to have a flattened shape.

When to Plant Autumn Crocus:

The best time to plant autumn-flowering Crocus is late July to September. Plant the corms around 4 inches deep in gritty, well-drained soil. These plants are perfect for pots and borders and will flower from September into November.

Tip – Plant Crocus corms in drifts in grassy areas or around other plants for a naturalistic look.

Here are some of our favourite Autumn Crocus varieties:

Crocus ‘Sativus’
Crocus ‘Kotschyanus’
Crocus Sternbergia ‘Lutea’

When to Plant Spring Crocus:

Spring Crocus bloom from late February into spring, so the best time to get these corms planted is September-November, just before the ground freezes in Winter. Plant Crocus corms around 4 inches deep in gritty, well-drained soil.

Here are some of our favourite Spring Crocus varieties:

Crocus ‘Orange Monarch’
Crocus ‘Fuscotinctus’
Crocus ‘Grand Maitre’