Grown Your Own: Asparagus in Patio Growing Sacks

Asparagus
Asparagus Backlim – End of season variety, thick spears. Excellent flavor.

 

You don’t have to use our Patio growing sacks for just potatoes – they work equally well for growing Asparagus! (you can even grow Rhubarb in them).

 

 

 

You can get Asparagus all year round in supermarkets BUT recently there has been a huge drive to ‘support local’ so from April to June (British cropping season) the shelves will be full of UK varieties.

Asparagus will produce their first real crop 12 months after planting. If you are growing your own you can buy varieties to cover the whole cropping season – see J Parker’s range here.

 

Asparagus Gijnlim
Asparagus Gijnlim – Early, high yielding, medium size spears. Quality favorite for commercial growers.

Asparagus grow in trenches in fields and the border so we need to replicate this in the grow bag. Make sure the bag has drainage holes, if not make some.

Step 1 – Create a hole 6-8 inches deep in the middle of the bag with a small mound of compost at the bottom. Well-rotted manure or general fertilizer can be used in the compost.

Asparagus Herkolim
Asparagus Herkolim – Mid season variety. Large uniform spears . Premium quality and flavor

 

 

 

Step 2 – Spread the roots over the mound you have created at the bottom and cover the crown with 2 inches of soil, try and use fine soil for this or sieve/riddle before you cover the crown.

 

 

 

Step 3 – Fill up with compost as the shoots grow, gradually filling up the hole whilst still leaving a small part of the shoot exposed. When the shoots reach the main level the hole can be filled completely.

Step 4 – Water newly planted crowns thoroughly and keep damp during dry weather.

Step 5 – Any stems produced within the first 12 months should be left to produce bushy stems, the foliage will look like ferns.

Asparagus Pacific Purple
Asparagus Pacific Purple – Purple variety with sweet, string-less spears in May-Early June

Step 6 – Cut down the stems in autumn to 5cm above soil level.

Step 7 – The following year the stems can be harvested. When they are 12cm/5 inches long cut the stems 7cm/3 inches below the soil. Do not let the spears grow too tall.

Step 8 – By mid-June stop harvesting, let any remaining spears fully develop to fortify next year’s crop.

 

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