What to Plant In September

We will soon have to bid a tearful goodbye to the end of summer, but there’s still lots to look forward to! September is the perfect month to plant a variety of blooms and plants to give us something to look forward to.

Here’s what to plant in September, from early-flowering spring bulbs to mid-season varieties and everything in between!

Spring-flowering Bulbs

We already have our sights set on spring as the autumn planting season looms over us! We couldn’t be any more excited to get our spring-flowering bulbs in the ground. Whether it be trusty daffodils or sensational tulips, this month you can start planting your spring bulbs as soon as they arrive at your door.

Daffodil Cheerfulness
Tulip China Pink

Iris Reticulata

Flowering as early as February, the gorgeous Iris reticulata can now be planted from September. Our bulbs are delivered from mid-August, giving you plenty of time to start thinking about your early spring displays.

Iris reticulata Alida
Iris reticulata ‘Spot On’

Early Spring Blooms

Speaking of early spring displays, our selection of early-flowering spring bulbs can provide you with carpets of colour from February to March! Order yours today to plant them in September.

Muscari Magic Collection
Single Flowering Snowdrops

Peonies

Ahh, perfect peonies. From late September, you can start planting these beauties around the garden to see them appear next spring and early summer. Explore our full selection of gorgeous peony blooms on our website and create a striking display.

Peony Double Flowering Collection
Peony Honey Gold

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When to Plant Spring-flowering Bulbs

spring-flowering bulbs

Many spring-flowering bulbs are considered some of the most well-known blooms in the world. Their beauty knows no bounds, adding some much needed colour to the garden after the long, cold winter months.

If you’re planning a spring display and need to know when to plant your bulbs, then follow this simple guide.

When to Plant Your Spring-flowering Bulbs

spring-flowering tulips and daffodils

Most spring bulbs should be planted in Autumn. Any time between September and November is the most common planting window, allowing the bulb to chill before flowering in the spring.

For early-flowering varieties like daffodils and crocus, try and get them in the ground by the end of September. Mid-season flowering varieties like Tulips can be planted from October to late November.

Our Favourite Spring Varieties

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What to Plant in July

Summer is truly upon us! As the weather and soil warm up, now is the perfect time to get those Autumn flowering bulbs into the ground. Move that BBQ, rearrange that patio furniture and make space in those beds, a new growing season is upon us. From gorgeous Crocus to delicious berries (that go great in an Eton Mess!), it’s time to get stuck in.

Here is what you can plant this July.

Autumn Flowering Crocus

Don’t let your garden fade away, keep up the momentum with our Autumn Flowering Crocus range! They look especially beautiful when planted  in groups at the front of a border or in patio pots and containers alongside evergreen foliage. Supplied as top quality bulbs and corms, don’t leave your Autumn garden until too late.

Crocus Sativus (Saffron)
Crocus Autumn Flowering Mixed

Indoor Flowering Amaryllis

Bring the garden indoors with our Indoor Flowering Amaryllis bulbs. With a large assortment of collections, styles and colours to choose from, they’re an easy way to bring some of that garden magic indoors. When planted in fresh loam or compost, watch your flowers bloom in a beautiful display of colour.

Amaryllis Adele 34cm+
Amaryllis Alfresco 26cm+

Goji Berry

If you’re looking to start that new healthy lifestyle, Goji Berries are the one for you! High in vitamins and antioxidants, along with delicious little berries, this bush will produce beautiful purple/white flowers that bloom through summer encouraging pollinators such as butterflies into the garden.

Goji Berry (Lycium Barbarum)

Blueberries

Known as a modern day super food for it’s great source of Vitamin C, Blueberries are one of the UK’s most popular fruits! Whether you love it for the incredible health benefits or it’s subtly sweet taste, Blueberries are easy to plant and even easier to care for and once picked off the branch can be used in a wide range of ways.

Blueberry – All Season Collection
Blueberry Pink Lemonade

Tayberry

This marvellous mixture of a raspberry and blackberry is the size of a big raspberry with the sweetness and juice of a blackberry. Growing to the size of a large strawberry, the Tayberry is much more restrained than a blackberry and can be safely controlled. Don’t forget to prune back in winter!

Tayberry Madana

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Liven Up Winter/Spring Beds with Colourful Primulas

Lift your spirits in the dull days of winter with the bright colours of Primulas. No garden is complete without these cheerful and hardy perennials as they are available in a wide range of sizes, shapes and come in every colour imaginable. These easy to grow blooms are perfect any type of garden, whether you need to fill some ground space or adding some wonderful colour to the front of the border.

In this blog post, we will guide you through our favourite Primula varieties, planting tips and aftercare, so that you can grow a rainbow of beautiful Primulas even during those cold, winter months.

Top varieties

Primula Colour Carnival

Packed with vibrant shades, our ‘Colour Carnival’ are an exciting mixture of bi-coloured Primula. Their fragrant blooms are perfect for attracting pollinators to the spring garden. Easy to grow, robust plants for beds and borders.

Click here to view online.

Primula Husky Raspberry Punch

Brighten up the winter garden with the bursting brilliant pink hues of Primula ‘Raspberry Punch’. Flowering from January through to April, these cheery flowers will add a kick of colour to borders, pots, or why not plant them en-masse for a real eye-catching feature.

Click here to view online.

 Primula Primlet

Producing masses of stunning double and semi-double flowers, these blooms almost resemble a miniature rose in the midst of the winter/spring season. From yellows to violet hues, these hardy perennials are ideal for creating a rainbow in the winter border.

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 Primula Showstopper Lime/Cream

A bright and delicate perennial. Our beautiful new ‘Showstopper’ is a pure delight in the late winter garden when their lime tinted cream flowers are on show. Ideal for the border, beds and containers.

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Primula Wanda

Fill the winter garden with the beautiful fragrance of Primula Wanda. Plant them where you can enjoy their scent, such as in patio containers or the front of the border. Wanda is a beautiful mixture of vibrant, ruffled flowers that are perfect for any garden.

Click here to view online.

 

There are many benefits to growing Primulas:

  • A wide range of colours are available.

October Plant of the Month: Heather

A terrific plant that deserves a spot in any garden. They may be small, but Heather are inexpensive, evergreen plants that provide colour even in the coldest months. Originating from the Scottish Hylands, transform any garden border, patio or rockery with the vibrant floral clusters of Heather and turn any garden into a carpet of dazzling colour.

To celebrate Heather as our plant of the month, we have selected our best Heather mixtures and collections on offer, as well as ideal planting partners, a planting guide and even some traditional folklore about Scotland’s national flower.

Top Varieties

Winter Flowering Collection

These small Heathers make a big impact with their masses of tiny blooms that flower all winter long into the spring. This collection of low-growing evergreen shrubs make excellent and colourful ground cover.

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Winter Mixed (Erica)

One of the hardiest of the Heathers. This wonderful mix of Erica Heather are low and quick growers, which will form eye-catching mats of pink, white, purple of red blooms. The perfect plant to compliment early spring bulbs.

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Summer/Winter Collection

Fill your garden with beauty all year round with this collection. Our summer Heathers bloom from July-October, while our winter Heathers flower from December to February. Plant en masse on a slope and an impressionist’s landscape will burst into life.

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Summer Mixed (Calluna)

Among the most hardiest and most varied of all Heathers. Appearing from mid-late summer, these showy flowers practically glow with their bright and beautiful shades. An easy to grow contender for adding to cottage gardens or as ground cover.

Click here to view online.

Looking for some floral inspiration? Here are some tips on companion planting with Heather…

When planted en masse, Heathers and Heaths make a swath of tones and foliage with easy appeal and graceful texture. Adding some dimension to such plantings further enhances the garden area and increases interest year around.

Rhododendrons & Azaleas

A classic Heather companion. They crave the same acidic soil and consistent moisture on which Heather thrive. You can even feed Heather with a Rhododendron fertiliser.

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Pansies

When planting Heather in containers, keep it simple by accenting them with beautiful hardy Pansies. An excellent pot plant that grow well with Heather.

Click here to view online.

Lavender

Smaller flowering plants compliment Heather and bloom at different times, thereby extending the bloom show. The look of Lavender and Heather together is a real showstopper.

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Planting Guide

Planting Time: Autumn-Early Spring

June Plant of the Month: Alliums

Easy to grow and versatile enough to be able to be grown in borders, flower beds, patio pots and containers, Alliums they really will pack a punch and are a must have impact plant for spring and summer.

Also known as Ornamental Onions, Alliums are from the onion family and are a fantastic addition to any garden. They are great for deterring Aphids, protecting other plants in your garden as well as themselves making them excellent companion plants.

Why we love them

The striking, showy flower heads of the humble Allium have long been a favourite of the modern cottage gardener. Blending beautifully into a summer perennial border, tall statuesque Alliums will cheerfully tower above lower growing plants just a seamlessly as smaller Alliums, which will add a zing to the front of a low border or edge.

Beyond the garden, Allium flowers and seed pods are excellent additions to cut flower displays. If you’re feeling creative, they can also be dried and sprayed to use as festive decorations.

Bee Friendly

Over the last few years we’ve been running a Spring flowering Bulb Competition (see details for this year’s competition here) and as these past entries show, (above) Alliums are highly attractive to bees! Great for the wildlife friendly gardener.

Where and when to Plant

For the best results position in full sun, and in well drained soils. For poorer soils treat with potash feed in the spring, which will help all your spring flowering bulbs and encourage them to return the following year.

Plant from early autumn at three or four times their own depth. The gaps you leave between Alliums will depend on their mature size, as well as your overall design ideas! For smaller alliums plant 10cm apart, the larger varieties will need at least 25cm in between. We indicate planting depths/distance for individual varieties on their own product pages.

Most Alliums will do well in containers as long as you give them enough space. They need a good 4cm of compost beneath each bulb, so choose deep pots, and for soil use any multipurpose compost, such as John Innes No 3. Some prefer to mix equal parts soil to horticultural grit. Re-pot each autumn.

Flowers and Foliage

One of the most striking features of Alliums is the long, sturdy stems that keep those amazing pom-pom like balls of flowers suspended on high. From the base of the Alliums grows lush, lance like swords of green foliage. As the flowers fade the basal foliage will wilt and turn brown. Unsightly as it is, don’t try to remove the leaves until they have all completely died off or you will stop the bulb taking enough food for winter to ensure it comes back the following year. If you are including Alliums in your flower bed and border design it’s a good idea to ensure to surround them with low growing plants that flourish in late summer to screen the foliage as it browns. Lavender likes similar conditions to Alliums or Hardy Geraniums will come in after the Alliums and continue to the end of summer, or you could plant alongside Ornithogalum for a contrasting display as illustrated below.

Thanks to their increasing popularity, Allium varieties such as Purple Sensation, the huge Globemaster variety, and Sphaerocephalon – more commonly known as The Drumstick Allium – have become staples for many gardeners.

Click here to browse our full range of Alliums, delivered from mid-August onwards.