8 Top Roses for Scent

One of the many delights of strolling through the garden, beyond the visual is the fragrance and nothing combines both better than the Rose. We’ve hand-picked a selection of the most renowned, sweet-smelling bloomers that are impossible to resist.

 

Scroll down and discover some of the most fragrant roses you can grow.

Rose Black Baccara

Dark and alluring. Rose Black Baccara showcases petals as close to black as you can get in the Rose world. This Hybrid Tea Rose will be the envy of your neighbours when the scent of their highly fragrant petals fill the summer air. Perfect for border and containers.

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Rose Arthur Bell

Bring the bright beams of sunshine to the summer garden with these golden yellow, scented blooms. Flowering from summer in to autumn, this beautiful Floribunda Rose produces large layered petals that give off a delightfully sweet fragrance. An ideal bloomer for showcasing at the front of the border.

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Rose MargAret Merrill

Margaret Merril has a delicate beauty and one of the best perfumes. This repeat flowering Floribunda Rose was rated number one for fragrance by England’s Royal National Rose Society ahead of all of the English Roses. These blush-tinted white flowers will brighten up the garden, without a doubt.

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Rose Prima Ballerina

Why not add a pinch of pink to the garden border? Rose Prima Ballerina is a beautiful large-flowering Hybrid Tea Rose with delightfully strong scented candyfloss pink blooms. Enjoy this intoxicating shrub as a striking statement plant at the back of the border or in containers.

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Rose Blue Moon

One of the original and still the best of the ‘blue’ shade Roses. This magical Hybrid Tea Rose will dazzle in the garden with their profusion of icy-blue flowers. This florist favourite is perfect for summer borders and as cut flowers for the home and will add a pleasant fragrance that cannot be missed.

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Rose Fragrant Delight

One of the most popular Floribunda varieties. Finely shaped trusses of heavily scented blooms flower in a blend of coral pink and orange shades. Plant where you can appreciate and enjoy their sweet fragrance. Perfect for small spaces, pots and containers and borders.

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Rose Fragrant Cloud

An excellent all-round Rose with deep coral-red blooms. Noted for its incredibly powerful perfume, this lovely Hybrid Tea Rose produces a strong fruity fragrance that will create a beautiful sensory experience in the summer garden. Perfect for attracting pollinators to the garden.

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Rose Double delight

Meet one of the world’s most famous Roses. This award-winning Rose Double Delight was voted into the Rose Hall of Fame in 1985. A fantastic Hybrid Tea Rose with ravishing ruffled, strawberry-edged blooms. Their extremely fragrant flowers are perfect for cutting.

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Don’t forget! All these Roses make great cut flowers too.

Continue reading 8 Top Roses for Scent

How to Plant: Currants

If you are a home gardener and want to grow something which will adorn your garden and at the same time will be useful to you (rather than being just showy), consider currants! They are a beautiful fruit (and its flowers too) to look at, as well as being an excellent source of home grown produce for using in your own recipes. In this blog, we’ll be covering all the areas of planting currants, from varieties, planting instructions and aftercare to make your gardening jobs easier.

Celebrated for their high vitamin C content, currant berries make an excellent addition to your fruit garden and to a healthy diet. There are many reasons to grow them; firstly, they are extremely easy and hassle-free to grow, so you require not much knowledge of gardening; secondly, they give you a large yield of a highly nutritious food item that will enhance your garden’s looks with delightful colours. With their main varieties being black, red and white, these are sweet and sour flavourful fruits that come in the following varieties (typically classified by their colours).

Blackcurrants

Blackcurrants are known for their strong flavour that makes the perfect addition to recipes for juices, pies, jellies and so much more.

Blackcurrant Wellington XXX

Blackcurrants are self-fertile plants, so we recommend planting blackcurrant plants close to each other, like our Blackcurrant Wellington XXX. This popular choice was established around sixty years ago and is a perfect addition to any gardens big or small, all you need is some space on the patio for a pot. A traditional variety, our Blackcurrant XXX produces heavy crops of fruit annually to give you an abundance of produce year after year.

Redcurrants

The humble Red Currant Berry have really proven to be an enduringly popular choice among fruit gardeners. Red currants are typically used for making jellies, juices, purees and more. They are usually self-pollinating plants but, in some conditions, benefit from cross-pollinating with another variety, like another red or white variety.

Currants Red Lake

Our Currants Red Lake are a vigorous species due to their prolonged periods of blooming and ripening. This is a simple to grow variety producing heavy crops of red berries year after year. An ideal choice for both experienced and amateur gardeners; our ‘Red Lake’ is perfect for harvesting your own produce for that summer vitamin boost.

 

White Currants

White currants are a variety of sweet, succulent berries with a grape-like flavour, perfect for serving fresh for a summer treat. Just like red currants, white currants are too usually self-pollinating but can cross-pollinate with other varieties. Perfect soft fruit additions to the garden for a bountiful and sweet April/May harvest.

Currant White Versailles

Currant White Versailles is an easy fruit to grow, making them a perfect choice for both experienced and amateur gardeners. Producing a heavy crop of white berries on trailing trusses year after year, this particularly sweet variety is a perfect choice for the cool conditions of the north of England, as they thrive best in cooler climates.

Planting

Here is our easy to follow guide for planting a garden full of currants for summer fruit.

  • Plant between Autumn through till Spring.
  • Use well-drained, weed-free soil enriched with well-rotted manure.
  • Plant in a sunny or at most a dappled shade position.
  • Plant with tip of stem at soil level and approx. 150cm apart and 150cm between rows.
  • Water well after planting and daily afterwards in dry weather.
  • Same planting process applies for potted plants.

Tutorial

In this tutorial, our resident gardening expert Jeff demonstrates how to plant Blackcurrant plants for delicious and healthy summer produce.

Tips

  • Train as an open centred, goblet-shaped bush – this allows light and air to flow freely around the branches and makes picking easier.
  • Add additional mulch every year to bring plants up to the proper depth.
  • Keep the soil moist by watering from the time they begin growing in spring until after harvest.
  • Add some fertiliser once a year in the early spring.

Aftercare

  • Remove fallen leaves and other plant debris before snowfall.
  • Prune anytime between October and March; this will improve sun exposure to the plant and help to maintain good air circulation.
  • Beginning in the fourth year, prune out the oldest wood annually.
  • Remove any weak new growth.

Planting Companions

Companion planting is an integral part of gardening for maximizing the use of your garden space, providing nutrients, shade or support, increasing crop productivity, attracting beneficial insects and there are many more perks. Since currants do well planted in shade, pairing them with other plants that prefer shade is the best choice for pairings.

For current companions, here are some of our top flower pairing choices:

Marigold Marvel Vanilla

Marigolds are a great pairing for currants as they help to keep pests away from their produce, like pesky hoverflies.  One of our favourite varieties is our Marigold Marvel Vanilla; this double flowering variety blooms creamy white flowers that would pair beautifully alongside currant bushes in beds and borders.

 

 

Apple Blenheim Orange

In a shady, unused spot, you can try planting your currant bushes under an apple tree, like our beautiful Apple Blenheim Orange. This excellent red flushed variety is a perfect addition for creating a fantastic edible garden. Our Blenheim Orange produces a heavy crop and makes an amazing accompaniment to traditional pie recipes and other delicious desserts.

Click here to view our full Currant range

How to Prune: Roses

Roses

pruning-roses-yellow-and-red

How – In General…

For most roses you can prune in late winter. Take care to remove dead/diseased wood and deadhead faded blooms which can be done with your annual pruning. Cut no more than 5mm above a bud with a clean, sloping cut away from the bud so water cannot gather there. Trace any suckers back to their roots and pull them away.

When…

Bush, Floribunda and Hybrid Tea Roses

Bush Roses should be well pruned in mid-March in Southern England and as one proceeds further north this should be deferred at such a rate that in the North of Scotland it is done in the second week of April.

Rose Arthur Bell

 

 

Floribunda Roses are a little tenderer and should be pruned one week later than the above dates.

 

 

 

 

Hybrid Tea – Newly planted  Hybrid Tea Roses should always be pruned back hard in the spring, provided the roots are firmly established, leaving only three or four eyes per stem, generally leaving about 15-25cm in length. Roses are roughly pruned in the nursery to approximately 35-45cm of stem. If left un-pruned they will die back along the stem and perish or produce leggy poor specimens.

Rose Climbing Compassion

 

Climbing Roses – Do not prune for two years after planting and then only sparsely, removing unrequired growing tips. Weak or dead wood should be removed. Best to prune in autumn.

 

 

 

Standard Roses – Stake well with expandable ties, driving in the stake below the head of the tree. Plant Rose Tree to old soil mark level. Put liberal amounts of planting medium in hole. Prune back well in spring to good bud.

Rose The Fairy Pink

Miniature Roses – These are miniature versions of Hybrid Tea or Floribunda types and should be treated the same allowing for the difference of scale. Miniature Roses are ideal for borders and rockeries or as pot plants, though they should be in the dry atmosphere of the house only for limited periods. Prune hard after planting.

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