When to Prune Clematis

Loved for their long lasting presence and rich colours, is it any wonder that Clematis plants are one of the most popular climbers on the market. To ensure healthy growth and encourage more flowers, pruning is an important part of Clematis care.

When it comes to pruning it can be hard to know where to start, so we’ve compiled an easy gardening guide to show you when and how to prune Clematis plants.

When does your Clematis flower?

The key to knowing when to prune your Clematis is knowing when your plant blooms. If you’re unsure, wait until your plant blooms and then match your Clematis to the correct flowering season.

When to Prune Clematis?

For young Clematis plants, give a hard pruning to one or two of the healthy base stems in the first spring after planting.

Here’s our seasonal pruning guide for established plants:

Winter/Spring Flowering:

Prune the vines right after they finish flowering in spring. The new stems that grow will then have enough time to make flower buds for the following year.

Winter/Spring flowering Clematis plants:

Clematis ‘Jingle Bells’
Clematis ‘Freckles’
Clematis ‘Winter Beauty’

Spring/Summer Flowering:

Thin out and disentangle stems before growth begins in late winter or early spring. In late spring or early summer, go over the plant again after the earliest flowers fade and severely shorten the stems that produced flowers. 

Spring/Summer flowering Clematis plants:

Clematis ‘Elizabeth’
Clematis ‘armandii’
Clematis ‘Apple Blossom’

Summer/Autumn Flowering:

Late Summer/Autumn flowering Clematis need a hard pruning annually. Cut back all old stems to the first pair of healthy buds (around 15-30cm above ground level). If left without any pruning, these Clematis will become top-heavy and produce very few flowers.

Summer/Autumn flowering Clematis:

Clematis ‘Sieboldii’
Clematis ‘Aromatica’
Clematis ‘Madame Julia Correvon’

Check out some of our other blogs:

The Perfect Climbers for Every Season

Add elegant colour, cover bare walls, or add height and interest to the garden, there’s so much that climbing plants can do for the garden. Whether you’re looking for gorgeous fragrance or a visual impact, in this blog post we’ve narrowed down the best climber for every season.

Climbers for summer interest ☀

Honeysuckle Gold Flame

A strong climber with a beautiful perfume. Their cartwheel-shaped red and orange flowers are perfect for growing over a wall or fence.

Clematis florida Sieboldii

Clematis are one of the most popular climbers around. These creamy white flowers with bright purple centres are ideal for walls or trellises.

Star Jasmine

A decedent climber with rich, creamy flowers. Blooming from June through to September, enjoy their fragrance all summer long.

Climbers for autumn interest 🍂

Virginia creeper

A rustic and rich coloured climber. This carefree perennial bursts with autumnal colours and looks perfect along walls and fences.

Clematis Princess Diana

Add a touch of royalty to the garden with the rich pink flowers of Clematis Princess Diana. Perfect for walls and containers.

Passiflora Edulis

Hardy, evergreen and exotic, this stunning climber blooms from summer through to October. A real eye-catching sight in containers on the patio.

Climbers for winter interest ❄

Clematis Jingle Bells

Add a touch of festive cheer to the garden with these snow white blooms. Perfect for adding height to the back of a bed or border.

Winter Jasmine

A cheery sight to brighten up the dull days of winter in the garden. Easy to grow and highly fragrant, these vibrant yellow flowers are ideal for pots or around a trellis.

Pyracantha Golden Charmer

Also known as Firethorn, this versatile climbing shrub produces stunning white flowers in the spring and vibrant berries in the autumn.

Climbers for spring interest 🌸

Chocolate Vine

Producing sweet-scented, violet flowers followed by sweet tasting fruit, bring your spring garden to life with this vigorous climber.

Clematis Apple Blossom

One of the most popular evergreen climbers around. Add romance to the garden with these pink flushed spring flowers. Perfect for cascading over walls and fences.

Clematis montana Elizabeth

Blooming with masses of blush pink flowers, this springtime beauty is perfect for covering fences and walls. Great for wildlife too!

5 Simple Steps for Growing Clematis

Available in an assortment of stunning shapes, colours and sizes, it’s no wonder why Clematis plants are so popular! Whether you prefer wall trailers or pretty potted plants, there’s a perfect Clematis out there for every garden and they even flower almost all year round.

With spring planting season upon us, it’s the perfect time to get your Clematis plants in the ground. If you’re in need of some gardening tips, follow our essential Clematis planting steps below:

1. Choose the Perfect Spot

Whether you prefer pots on the patio or planting in the border, Clematis plants can do both. Ideal for planting in the springtime, don’t forget that Clematis plants need plenty of space for adequate air flow as well as a rich, well-draining planting area. Dig the hole large enough to accommodate the plant – at least a two foot depth of soil amended with compost prior to planting.

2. Provide Proper Support

As with other climbing plants, the growing end of the vine is on a mission, always searching for something new to grab onto. When a vine can’t find anything to grab, the end stops growing and will die back. Providing the right type of support from the start helps the plant look good and grow well.

Clematis vines can break very easily. Older stems look woody but will crack if they’re bent. Young stems appear to be supple but are actually brittle. So to avoid the heartbreak of your plant flopping, make time in late spring and early summer to correct wandering stems and tie-in top-heavy growth.

3. Pruning is Key

It is tempting to plant your lovely, leggy Clematis and let it get on with it. In fact, all newly planted clematis benefit from being cut back to just above a leaf node no more than 12″ off the ground. 6″ is even better.

This first prune encourages the plant to sprout from the base and gives you a much bushier healthier plant. If you really must, let it flower, but sometime between planting and the following November, cut all clematis back hard.

4. Water well

Until they establish, Clematis are thirsty plants. They should be watered about an inch or so weekly, and more deeply during dry spells.

5. Keep an Eye on Pests

Be on the lookout for common problems that affect Clematis plant health. Clematis wilt can cause vines to suddenly collapse and die after their foliage and stems have blackened. Powdery mildew often affects plants with poor air circulation. Aphids and spider mites can be a problem as well.

🌸🌸 Now you’ve got all the key ingredients to grow a beautiful climbing Clematis! 🌸🌸

Summer Gardens for Small Spaces

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you have a compact garden and are looking to create an amazing summer display but don’t know how? In this guide, we will be sharing all our small garden tips and tricks to turn your miniature garden/tiny terrace and petite patios in to a show stopping display of shapes and colours.

Design Ideas

  • Vertical Planting: Create a Living Wall

With a little bit of creativity, a few plants and a vertical corner just waiting to be brought to life, there’s no reason for anyone to give up having a garden due to lack of space. If you don’t think your gardening skills are up to a whole host of plants, try growing a climbing plant up one wall for an easy display of stunning foliage and flowers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Top Choices

Honeysuckle American Beauty

Honeysuckle is a fantastic climber with the added bonus of attracting wildlife with their sweetly scented flowers. Our American Beauty variety is a beautiful, eye-catching plant for their mulit-coloured rich tones of blooms, making them a popular choice for the summer garden.

 

 

Clematis Viticella Huldine

 

This gorgeous variety of Clematis is a strong grower producing a dazzling array of white flowers with creamy yellow stamens. This climber makes the perfect addition to the summer garden for coverage on trellises and archways.

 

 

 

  • Think Big (Impact)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ample pathways can make a real statement in a small garden. Planting scented plants, flowers and herbs will create an impact on the senses with a variety of bold colours and fragrant scents, as well as attracting wildlife to the garden.

Our Top Choices

Lavender Rosea

 

This twist on the traditional lilac evergreen Lavender varieties, Rosea is ideal for planting in rows along pathways, around the patio and in the garden for a display of beautiful pale pink blooms and their staple lavender fragrance.

 

 

Penstemon Mixed

Bring a bright mixture of colours to your pathways this summer with there pretty foxgloves. Penstemon Mixed have a neat compact habit making them a versatile option for the summer garden as they are suitable for beds, borders and containers. Also, as an added bonus, they are loved by bees and butterflies!

 

 

  • Create Secluded Areas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Divide the garden and make your own secluded areas of the garden to break up the space to make your garden feel larger by adding areas of interest. By using tall narrow plants or climbers you can create spaces for different functions like a place for contemplation or an edible garden.

Our Top Choices

Phyllostachys aureacaulis Yellow Bamboo

 

Noted for it’s fascinating yellow colour, this variety of yellow bamboo can create a striking structure in the garden when planted together for a captivating and contrasting effect. A fantastic strong plant for designing a beautiful summer garden structure.

 

Pennisetum Alopecuriodes ‘Hameln’

 

This ornamental grass produces strong green stems topped with pink cloud like flowers making this the perfect variety for creating an area of relaxation in the garden with their dense foliage and feathery flowers.

 

 

 

  • Smart Planting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t bombard your garden with plants. For smaller spaces, keeping clutter at bay is the best way of creating the feeling of more space. Choosing the right plants for your space can be detrimental to creating a beautiful garden design and hanging basket, potted and patio plants are perfect for small spaces as they do not take up too much room and can be placed on the ground or up on shelves for an explosion of blooms and colour.

Our Top Choices

Begonia Superba Mixed

The fabulous bright colours of our Begonia Superba are the perfect eyecatching potted plants for your garden spaces. Suitable for planting in pots on the patio, place these flowers in clusters around your front porch, corners of decking or on low walls for a burst of summer colour.

 

 

Calibrachoa Chameleon Pink Passion

 

The beautiful shades of pink blooms in our Calibrachoa Chameleon Pink Passion make a stunning addition to summer pots and hanging baskets. Pot up in clusters around corners or along walls for a pretty display or plant in baskets for wall hangings.

 

Types of Small Gardens

  • City Garden/Balcony

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With more and more people being drawn to urban living and if you’re lucky enough to have your own inner city garden or outdoor space, creating your own private green oasis is possible. Small city spaces can be challenging but it’s an opportunity to get creative. You could pot up a mini orchard on your balcony and grow your own produce, create a small herb garden for a delight on the senses, or pot up a selection of plants along narrow spaces to give an illusion of a larger space. Transform your small spaces with these compact design hacks for beautiful summer displays.

Tips:

  • Container planting to keep clutter to a minimum.
  • Try portable planters to allow for adjusting your garden plants.
  • Vegetables, fruits and herbs are the best easy growing options for urban spaces.

Our Top Choices

Miniature Patio Fruit Trees Collection

Fancy growing your own fruit produce on your own patio? Our Miniature Patio Fruit Trees collection is ideal for producing a reliable source of delicious fruit and bringing colour and variety to your spaces. Their compact proportions make them perfect for placing in small, compact spaces.

 

Herbs Mixed

With small gardens, any surface can be an opportunity for planting. For an easy herb garden, our Herbs Mixed provides a range of herb varieties in a lucky dip style to allow you to harvest your own herbs for cooking or just as a focal piece on your balcony, patio or garden.

 

 

  • Courtyard Garden

Courtyard gardens may be small but they can be beautiful spaces with strategic planning, they can become alive with colour and textures without looking cluttered. Why not draw the eye by using repetition of container plants along paths or paving? or since courtyards are often shady, why not plant up big, glossy green plants to create your own tropical jungle feel?

Tips:

  • Plant in Containers to establish usable space.
  • Evergreens are great year round choices for creating structure.
  • Go vertical and plant climbers along walls or fencing for a large garden feel.

Our Top Choices

Hosta Touch of Class

 

This beautiful patterned variety of Hostaceae is perfect for container growing or in the border for adding a tropical feel to your small spaces with their waxy bottle green and lime yellow striped leaves. As an added bonus, this variety produces light lavender flowers in late summer.

 

Euphorbia Silver Fog

 

This compact evergreen perennial produces an array of silver-grey foliage and small white flowers throughout summer, making this plant the perfect versatile option for borders, patio pots and containers. They can even be used as a filler for hanging baskets for a pop of delicate blooms.

 

Small Space Hacks

  • Pallet Planters

Wooden pallets are a great DIY idea for creating unique vertical planters to help save space in the garden. Turn an old pallet lying around your home in to a fun herb garden, vegetable patch or a unique floral display.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Verticle Vegetable Gardening

For a modern twist on the ordinary vegetable garden, using different variations of planters can help spruce up a cluttered garden to bring a touch of individuality and organisation to your green spaces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Windowsill Gardening

If you live in a city, space for gardening can be sparse, so why not try growing plants indoors? Succulents have become popular indoor plants but try growing some unique options like a windowsill herb collection and bring the green indoors.

 

 

How to Prune: Climbing Plants

Climbing Plants

Climbing plants can benefit from regular pruning to ensure that they do not become too overgrown and out of control.

Clematis, will need to be pruned to about 20cm on planting. Most Clematis plants will require you to remove dead heads and stems, cutting back to where strong buds appear (in late winter).

 

 

Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’ and ‘Ville de Lyon’ only require light pruning (in February) in subsequent years. Clematis jackmanii should always be pruned back hard while Montana type Clematis such as Montana Mayleen, which is very vigorous, just needs to be cut back to control.

 

Lonicera, commonly known as the fragrant Honeysuckle, just need you to trim out the wood occasionally after flowering, removing the longer wayward shoots that have become overgrown or beginning to die off.

 

 

Evergreen Trachelospermum jasminoides  can be pruned in late winter and early spring when the flowering has finished.

 

 

 

 

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