How to Prune Your Roses

pruning roses

Roses are a hardy plant and are often happy to grow undisturbed, so it can be difficult to tell when to prune your roses. However, light pruning at the right time of year helps to promote healthy growth and flowering as well as helping to maintain a sensible size for your rose plant.
To see your beautiful roses effortlessly bloom year after year, it’s best to prune them at the start of each year. But when? and how?

Keep reading this rose pruning guide to find out how and when you should be pruning your roses.

When Should You Prune Your Roses?

single yellow rose after pruning

Your pruning window may be slightly different depending on where you live. For example, if you live in the south, you can get away with pruning in mid-February. If you live further north, you should probably wait until March when the weather is warmer. Pruning can also depend on the type of rose plant.

Rose Shrubs should be well pruned in mid-March in Southern England, or in the second week of April when you get further north.

Climbing Roses shouldn’t be pruned for two years after planting and then only sparsely, removing unnecessary growing tips. It’s best to prune this rose type in autumn.

How to Prune Roses – Best Methods

pruning roses in the garden

For most roses, you can prune in late winter. Take care to remove dead/diseased wood and deadhead faded blooms which can be done with your annual pruning. Cut no more than 5mm above a bud with a clean, sloping cut away from the bud so water cannot gather. Keep your secateurs sharp for a clean cut.

Pruning Tip 💡 – Use fertilizer on your roses once you’ve pruned them to encourage healthy growth throughout the year!

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Climbing Roses – How and When to Plant Them

Climbing Roses are quintessentially English. They are often found in gardens across the UK and are a popular plant for cottage-style gardens as they add height to your garden. However, climbing roses can sometimes be difficult than some plants to grow, confusing many of us who are new to gardening.

That’s why we’ve gathered our expert knowledge to help those at any level achieve the cottage-style aesthetic they’ve always dreamed of. From planting to caring for your roses, we’re going to talk you through the entire process in this handy guide.

How to Plant Climbing Roses

Firstly, you need to decide what kind of roses you’d like to grow. Climbing roses are available in many popular rose variants, including English, single, double, scented, etc. You want to make sure you pick the perfect rose for you as they can last for decades.

A rose plant in its bare root form

Our climbing plants are sent in bare root form in mid-autumn. To plant your roses, dig a hole twice the depth and width of the root ball. Gently tease out some of the roots and place them in the hole; cover with soil and water once finished.

To train climbers up trellises and walls, put supports in place and prune out stems that start to grow in the wrong direction. Eventually, the rose plant will grow in one direction, needing pruning every so often.

Where to Plant Climbers

Climbers can be trained to grow on walls, fences, pergolas, and trellises.
When thinking of how and where to plant your roses, make sure you pick the area that catches a lot of sunshine and is planted in well-drained soil.

Ensure that you have chosen the ideal place for your roses, as they can become quite unruly. This suits the cottage-style aesthetic perfectly but can become hard to manage if you don’t keep your eye on it throughout the seasons.

When to Plant Your Roses

Bare-root roses should be planted in late autumn and early winter before growth resumes in the spring. Avoid planting them when it’s icy in the deep winter months, as this will affect the plant and will stop it from growing in the springtime.

Caring for Your Rose Plants

Once your climbing roses have been planted, the most care they need is to be trained up their supports. Pruning and caring for your roses usually comes a year or two after planting, once they’ve grown to a certain point.

Climbing plants tend to grow horizontally, as it is their natural response to do so. They can grow upwards with the use of supports and gentle encouragement.

Eventually, the stems should develop shoots that grow vertically, which will carry the flower heads of the plant. Once this happens, you can prune back the horizontal stems, encouraging the flower to grow upwards in future seasons.

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Rose Climbing Zephirine Drouhin
Rose Climbing Golden Showers
Rose Climbing Compassion

How to Prune: Roses

Roses

pruning-roses-yellow-and-red

How – In General…

For most roses you can prune in late winter. Take care to remove dead/diseased wood and deadhead faded blooms which can be done with your annual pruning. Cut no more than 5mm above a bud with a clean, sloping cut away from the bud so water cannot gather there. Trace any suckers back to their roots and pull them away.

When…

Bush, Floribunda and Hybrid Tea Roses

Bush Roses should be well pruned in mid-March in Southern England and as one proceeds further north this should be deferred at such a rate that in the North of Scotland it is done in the second week of April.

Rose Arthur Bell

 

 

Floribunda Roses are a little tenderer and should be pruned one week later than the above dates.

 

 

 

 

Hybrid Tea – Newly planted  Hybrid Tea Roses should always be pruned back hard in the spring, provided the roots are firmly established, leaving only three or four eyes per stem, generally leaving about 15-25cm in length. Roses are roughly pruned in the nursery to approximately 35-45cm of stem. If left un-pruned they will die back along the stem and perish or produce leggy poor specimens.

Rose Climbing Compassion

 

Climbing Roses – Do not prune for two years after planting and then only sparsely, removing unrequired growing tips. Weak or dead wood should be removed. Best to prune in autumn.

 

 

 

Standard Roses – Stake well with expandable ties, driving in the stake below the head of the tree. Plant Rose Tree to old soil mark level. Put liberal amounts of planting medium in hole. Prune back well in spring to good bud.

Rose The Fairy Pink

Miniature Roses – These are miniature versions of Hybrid Tea or Floribunda types and should be treated the same allowing for the difference of scale. Miniature Roses are ideal for borders and rockeries or as pot plants, though they should be in the dry atmosphere of the house only for limited periods. Prune hard after planting.

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