Your Guide to Pelargoniums (Geraniums)

Pelargoniums, commonly known as geraniums, are a large, diverse group of beautiful, ornamental bedding plants. They come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes and wonderful colours making them one of the staples of many gardeners. They are used to provide colourful displays in beds and borders, hanging baskets and all manner of containers, plus indoors and in conservatories and greenhouses. From upright, climbing or cascading, to single and double flowering, our complete range is sure to have something that’s perfect for you. All of our Pelargoniums are UK-grown plants that are specially grown in dedicated UK nurseries.
Gardeners love to grow Pelargonium species for their long lasting blooms and beautiful vibrant flowers for . So let’s take a tour of the different varieties of Geraniums and their own unique characteristics.

Trailing Varieties

Trailing Geraniums are perfect for producing a stunning tumbling mass of colour and create a marvelous sight when gently cascading over the side of summer baskets and planters. Also named ivy Geraniums due to the resemblance of this geranium’s leaves with ivy, ivy Geraniums boast glossy leaves rather the fleshy, slightly curled at the edges leaves seen in zonals.

  • Single Flowering

The biggest feature of these geraniums is that they are of the trailing type and can be found tumbling out of hanging baskets with their cascades of pretty flowers. Their blooms can be either single or semi double for beautiful displays of colour.

Trailing Geranium Mixed

The beautiful Trailing Geranium Mixed produces an avalanche of colour often seen in Germany and Alpine Europe. This prolific flowering mixture will produce a colourful and vibrant swathe of blooms that trail 60-70cm. They require little attention and are drought resistant, perfect for hanging baskets and window boxes.

  • Double Flowering

Like the well-loved traditional single Geranium, this superb double trailing variety is incredibly hardy and flowers continuously throughout the summer, producing distinctive, scalloped foliage and dense clusters of ruffled, double flower heads for twice the amount of beauty.

Geranium Double Trailing Red

These double trailing Geraniums have a fantastic cascading habit making them perfect for hanging baskets. The rosebud like flowers are bursting with a vibrant bright red colour that will create an eye catching display whether planted on their own or mixed with other trailing plants.

Patio Varieties

These upright varieties look great in pots and containers and can be used in your garden borders and rockeries to great effect during spring and summer. Here is a guide to the different species of patio Geraniums.

  • Zonal and Grandeur

In addition to the name Zonal Geraniums, they are often called garden or common geraniums. Zonal geraniums are a type of Pelargonium that get their name from the “zone” of red, blue, or purple colour striping through the middle of their leaves, so this physical attribute is a helpful way to distinguish a zonal Geranium. Also bushy plants and mainly used for containers and bedding, these Geraniums have been hybridized for size and an abundance and colors of flowers.

Geranium Grandeur Power Rose Splash

Geranium Grandeur Power Rose Splash will produce stunning flowers in summer. Producing strong, vibrant flowers with luxurious bushy foliage at the base, this variety is great for growing on the patio or in containers where they can be fully appreciated. Also, with their fine foliage, they are a great addition to a bed or border.

 

  • Climbing Antik

These climbing Antik geraniums are extremely vigorous growers, able to reach around 150cm tall in a single season. These giant Geraniums come in a great range of colours and will create a beautiful display when planted in large containers.

Geranium Antik Pink

Geranium Antik Pink is a gorgeous pink blush which deep green foliage. Perfect for a large container display as illustrated to enhance your patio space. With supports these vigorous geraniums will climb up to 2m and create a true showstopping piece in the summer time.

Seed Raised Garden Ready Plants

Our F1 Geraniums do not disappoint, producing an abundance of rounded, papery flowers in rich scarlet red above palmately lobed foliage. We only use finest quality F1 seeds to produce compact yet robust plug plants with well-established root systems.

Geranium Century F1 Red

Producing an abundance of rounded, papery flowers, our Geranium Century F1 Red will add a touch of elegance to the summer garden with their rich scarlet red blooms and palmately lobed foliage. These Geraniums are the perfect choice for providing masses of colour to your summer flower beds and patio containers.

 

 

Flowering from June to September this prolofic flowering and colourful mixture of Geraniums produces an abundance of bright colours to liven up the summer garden. These versatile plants look fantastic when planted on the patio in containers or as a stunning flower bed display. Also worth a try on window boxes.

Planting Guide

  • Plant out Pelargoniums in May through to June (after the danger of frost has passed).
  • Pelargoniums can be grown in borders or containers. In borders or beds, plant in fertile, neutral to alkaline soil. Most prefer full sun. Regal cultivars prefer partial shade and zonal cultivars will tolerate some shade.
  • Dig a good sized hole, big enough to easily accommodate the rootball. Add a layer of organic matter – such as compost or planting compost – to the base of the hole and fork it in.
  • Place the rootball in the planting hole and adjust the planting depth so that it is planted at the same depth as it was originally growing and the top of the rootball is level with the soil surface.
  • Mix in more organic matter with the excavated soil and fill in the planting hole.
  • Water in well, apply a granular general feed over the soil and add a 5-7.5cm (2-3in) deep mulch of well-rotted garden compost or bark chippings around the root area to conserve soil moisture and help keep down weeds.

Video Tutorials 🎥

Trailing Geraniums

Geranium Century

Geranium Monarda

HAPPY PLANTING!

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Complete Guide: How to Plant Fuchsias

 

Fuchsias, with their fairy-like blooms hanging from rich, green foliage have long been a popular staple in the British summer garden. In fact, the popularity of the Fuchsia is such that there is even a national society for them, The British Fuchsia Society. They are easy to grow and maintain, plus they provide brightly coloured summer to autumn displays in hanging baskets, containers or patio pots.

Background:

Although widely used in British gardens, the Fuchsia is native to South and Central America as well as other countries with tropical and sub-tropical climates like New Zealand and Tahiti. Renowned French botanist Charles Plumier is recognised for first coming across the much-loved Fuchsia plant during an exhibition to the Caribbean in the late 1690’s, Plumier named it Fuchsia after German Physician and botanist, Leonhart Fuchs (1501-1566). Fuchs is credited as creating the first medicinal botanical garden in Germany which he used for teaching his medical students.

Why choose Fuchsia:

Fuchsia have a great many attributes, the greatest among them being that once planted and established they can thrive in the British climate for years with minimal amount of care, here are a few more reasons why the Fuchsia is so popular:

  • Approximately 2,000 varieties of Fuchsia in the UK which come in a range of sizes and colour combinations
  • You don’t need many plug plants to achieve a fulsome and vibrant display
  • They are prolific flowering and will bloom from summer through to autumn in partially shaded locations or in full sun
  • Their pendulous blooms are perfect in trailing hanging baskets, containers and in patio pots
  • Climbing Fuchsias can cover arches and trellis’s easily, they can even be used to disguise unsightly fences or sheds

Types of Fuchsia:

Fuchsia are usually grouped into three categories: hardy, upright or trailing. A common trait to all types of Fuchsia is how the pendulous flower-heads will bloom with the outer petal peeling back to reveal the inner petals, formed in a bell-like shape. Often the colour or shade of the outer petals will be different the inner ones; giving the blooms their fairy-like appearance. Fuchsia come in a range of sizes and colours: pinks, purples, whites red and oranges in all manner of shades and combinations.

Hardy:

A range of bushy and, as implied, hardy varieties. Once established they can be left to the British weather all year round. However, it worth considering which part of the UK you are based in. Sub-tropical Cornwall’s Fuchsias will certainly have no issues, but it may well be worth covering up or taking more Northern based Fuchsia’s inside during frosty spells. Pinch the new shoots to encourage bushy and profuse flowering.

Upright:

Upright, Bush or climbing Fuchsias can be trained into wonderful shapes. They look particularly effective when trained over an archway. The beautiful, often pendant-shaped flowers are a delight coming in in shades of pink, white and purple. Our bedding range of Fuchsia plants includes upright varieties that are ideal for pots, containers and the summer border as well as some amazing climbing Fuchsias.

Trailing:

This variety of Fuchsia is perfect for hanging basket displays and in potted displays, trailing elegantly over hanging the edges. This type is more sensitive to frosts and should be brought in during cold weather snaps. You can even get a giant variety of trailing Fuchsia which look especially effective with their ample, larger sized pendulous flower-heads.

Climbing:

These vigorous hardy climbing Fuchsias produce abundant flowers along upright climbing stems throughout the summer through to October. With a little support they will rapidly climb up arches, fences and trellis and are ideal for large pots or containers on the patio.

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How to plant Fuchsia:

  1. Plant your Hardy Fuchsias in spring or autumn. Other varieties should be planted once all danger of frosts has passed in early to mid spring.
  2. We recommended using John Innes No2 compost when planting up your Fuchsia, avoid composts that are too peaty. In pots or baskets, three plugs will give an ample and effective display. The compost doesn’t need to be tightly compacted in your chosen container, Fuchsia do well with good drainage. If planting in a border display, space 30-40 cm apart.
  3. Once planted, water once a week. Take care to keep them moist but not waterlogged. Start by feeding them once a week. To encourage more blooms on your Fuchsia, feed with a high potash liquid feed and dead head fading flowers regularly.
  4. Fuchsia can be placed in a partially shaded or sunny location; however, they will appreciate partial shade during in the heat of the day during the summer months.
  5. It’s worth checking your Fuchsias over for pests and insects. The Fuchsia gall mite is one to keep an eye out for. Although the pest is not frequently or widely reported in the UK, the past ten years has seen this Fuchsia munching pest in gardens along the south coast and in some northern counties too. A little vigilance goes a long way in deterring the mite and harsh chemical treatments are not necessary. Simply check over your Fuchsia, remove and burn any damaged shoots, especially if they appear a yellowish-green or swollen and distorted.
  6. Prune back in spring just before new growths appear. With Hardy Fuchsia it’s best to prune back to ground level.

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Complete Guide: How to Plant Roses

Roses are a much loved addition to the garden and are guaranteed to add that classic, often times rustic feel to the summer. Few shrubs/plants will add the elegance and beauty to the British garden quite like these classic beauties.

Roses can come in a number of colours, shapes and sizes and are grown for their attractive and often fragrant flowers, flowering mainly in summer and autumn. Roses are ideal for planting as stand-alone specimens, planted together in groups, miniature roses can be used in raised beds and climbing varieties to climb a wall, trellis or a fence. All make perfect cut flowers.

We’ve put together a comprehensive guide of everything you need to know about how to plant Roses from choosing which variety is for you, to getting them in the ground and on-going maintenance.

Hybrid Tea (HT) Roses – Prolific flowering, scented well-formed blooms, these classic and popular roses are prized for their distinctive colour and shape.

Floribunda Roses – Produces in clusters these really give you more roses for your money! Great bedding plants and good in the vase, the blooms are open and less of a classic rose shape than the HT varieties but they do have a real charm that’s all their own.

Climbing Roses – Ideal for potting up and growing against a garden wall, fence or trellis, excellent for bringing a fairytale look and a romantic feel to your garden display.

Hedging Roses – When growing a hedge or low screen, Roses may not necessarily be a plant which jumps to mind, but we have been able to source a number of specially selected hedges which produce roses. This is an exciting and novel way of introducing not only a hedge for practical reason, but also something that is aesthetically pleasing to the eye.

Standard Roses – Grafted onto stems of approximately 80cm with three or more strong branches are available to buy now, a fantastic way of adding some impact the summer garden. They are perfect where space is a premium, as these compact beauties can be grown in large pots on the patio.

Miniature Roses – Small but perfectly scaled, growing to just 40-50cm. These beautiful miniature roses are ideal in containers and rockeries where space can be an issue. Despite their small size, miniature roses are extremely hardy.

Cascading Roses – Rose the Fairy form well branched plants smothered in glossy, dark green foliage. They make excellent plants, as once established require little care. They are ideal for adding to summer flower arrangements, flowers are individually small, but form double petals in large clusters giving a big impact.

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How to Plant Roses

To plant, dig a hole large enough to take the roots when fully outspread, remembering that the point at which the plant was originally budded should be sufficiently low in the hole to be 2.5cm below the surface of the soil when it is filled in. Distribute the roots evenly round the hole and put in a little fine soil to which has been added a small amount of bone meal.

Fill in a further 5cm of ordinary soil over the roots and tread in firmly. Tread in additional soil firmly at each stage as the hole is filled. Roses must be firmly planted. If they are not the winds of winter will loosen the roots and may cause the newly planted rose to die.

Generally speaking, the depth of holes in which the roses are to be planted will vary between 10-20cm but examination of the plants will show quite clearly the depth to which they were originally planted and this depth should be adhered to provided that it does place the point at which the stock was budded just below the surface of the soil.

How to Prune Roses

Tips for Pruning Bush Roses, Floribunda or Hybrid Tea

Bush Roses should be well pruned in mid-March in Southern England and further north this should be deferred at such a rate that in the North of Scotland it is done in the second week of April.

Floribunda Roses are a little tenderer and should be pruned one week later than the above dates.

Newly planted Hybrid Tea Roses should always be pruned back hard in the spring, provided the roots are firmly established, leaving only three or four eyes per stem, generally leaving about 15-25cm in length. Roses are roughly pruned in the nursery to approximately 35-45cm of stem. If left unpruned they will die back along the stem and perish or produce leggy poor specimens.

Tips for Pruning Climbing Roses

Do not prune for two years after planting and then only sparsely, removing unrequired growing tips. Weak or dead wood should be removed.

Stake well with expandable ties, driving in the stake below the head of the tree. Plant Rose Tree to old soil mark level. Put liberal amounts of planting medium in hole. Prune back well in spring to good bud.

Tips for Pruning Miniature Roses

Miniature versions of Hybrid Tea or Floribunda and should be treated the same, allowing for the difference of scale. Miniature Roses are ideal for borders and rockeries or as pot plants, though they should be in the dry atmosphere of the house only for limited periods. Prune hard after planting.

Read our Pruning Guide for More Info

How to Prune: Climbing Plants

Climbing Plants

Climbing plants can benefit from regular pruning to ensure that they do not become too overgrown and out of control.

Clematis, will need to be pruned to about 20cm on planting. Most Clematis plants will require you to remove dead heads and stems, cutting back to where strong buds appear (in late winter).

 

 

Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’ and ‘Ville de Lyon’ only require light pruning (in February) in subsequent years. Clematis jackmanii should always be pruned back hard while Montana type Clematis such as Montana Mayleen, which is very vigorous, just needs to be cut back to control.

 

Lonicera, commonly known as the fragrant Honeysuckle, just need you to trim out the wood occasionally after flowering, removing the longer wayward shoots that have become overgrown or beginning to die off.

 

 

Evergreen Trachelospermum jasminoides  can be pruned in late winter and early spring when the flowering has finished.

 

 

 

 

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