Our Best Dahlias for Cut Flowers

Big, bold and beautiful, Dahlias are one of the most popular summer flowers due to their breathtaking flowers. Available in a wide assortment of colours, shapes and sizes, these eye-catching blooms not only shine in the garden but they make the most amazing cut flowers!

With Spring officially here, now is the perfect time to kick off your cutting garden and order some delightful Dahlia bulbs for planting in April. All Dahlia make exceptional cut flowers but we’ve done all the hard work and narrowed down a list of the most desirable varieties to add to your shopping list.

Dahlia ‘Edge of Joy’

The name says it all, these raspberry streaked white Decorative Dahlias will bring joy to the garden all summer long. A beautiful cut flower to pair with other pink Dahlias.

Dahlia ‘Painted Lady’

A stylish variety with the most unique colouring. ‘Painted Lady’ showcases fantastic pale pink blooms with flashes of crimson markings.

Dahlia ‘Toto’

These Dahlias shine like a ray of light inside the home. Their bright, daisy-like white flowers with yellow centres are hard not to fall in love with.

Dahlia ‘Ice Crystal’

These pure white blooms will bring a breath of fresh air to the home in the summer time. A gorgeous Cactus variety – reliable and sturdy.

Dahlia ‘Honka Red’

A prestigious RHS Garden Merit Award Winner. This cartwheel shaped Dahlia boats vibrant red blooms and will certainly add a unique touch to your summer flower vases.

Dahlia ‘Thomas Edison’

A big and brilliant Dinner Plate Dahlia. These dramatic deep purple blooms grow to an amazing 25cm in size. A real cut flower showstopper.

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

A delicate Dinner Plate Dahlia. Add a touch of elegance to your vases this summer with these rich creamy peach flowers.

Dahlia ‘Purple Puff’

These Anemone-flowering Dahlias (commonly known as Powder Puffs) are a glorious sight in the summer. Their purple-crimson flowers look perfect paired with other purple Dahlias.

Need some cut flower tips?

  • The more you cut the more they bloom!
  • Give you Dahlias a longer life by immersing the stems in boiling water for a few seconds – this will help to keep them fresh!
  • Cut your Dahlias just above a set of leaf nodes and side buds – new shoots with grow from the nodes.
  • Change your vase water every 2-3 days for maximum Dahlia lifespan.

Valentine’s Day Flowers to Grow at Home

With Valentine’s Day on the horizon, there are flowers in every shop and supermarket. Why not grow your own for next year? Anyone can grow cut flowers! It’s a personal, economical and rewarding way to show love to your family and friends.

ROSES

Roses are the flower most associated with love and romance. In Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Juliet says to her lover “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” to express that love has no boundaries. The rose has also been England’s national flower since The War of the Roses in the fifteenth century.

Blue Moon

Rose ‘Blue Moon’ is an unusual icy-blue colour and have a lovely fragrance, which makes them an eye-catching addition to bouquets and displays.

Fragrant Delight

This stunning rose is one of the most popular variety of Floribunda! Its blooms are coppery peach-pink blossom in colour and are highly fragrant.

Scarlet Queen Elizabeth

This bold red rose produces glamorous scarlet flowers with a subtle fragrance. The gorgeous red colour is a classic for a Valentine’s bouquet.

DIANTHUS

The name Dianthus comes from the Greek words ‘dios’ (god’) and ‘anthos’ (‘flower’). The common name ‘Carnation’ was derived from the Latin word ‘incarnation’, meaning the incarnation of God. It symbolises admiration, passion, affection, love and gratitude. One of the world’s oldest cultivated flowers, the popularity of Dianthus has remained throughout many centuries.

Doris

This delicate pretty pink flower has a wonderful striped red centre which makes it stand out. Doris has a subtle fragrance and is ideal for a cut flower display.

Scent First Memories

Memories is a beautiful creamy white flower from our ‘Scent First’ range of Dianthus which produce amazingly fragrant flowers.

Valda Wyatt

Our Valda Wyatt produces frilly vibrant pink blooms and have a lovely scent. They make fantastic cut flowers and a bright addition to bouquets.

IRIS

The Iris’s history dates back to Ancient Greek times when the Greek Goddess Iris, the messenger of the gods and the personification of the rainbow, acted as the link between heaven and earth. It was said that the flowers had the power to bring bliss and favour to earth and the people living on it. They symbolise faith, hope, wisdom and royalty.

‘Dance Ballerina Dance’

Ths beautiful and easy to grow Iris produces brilliant lilac-pink petals with pale pink ruffled edges. The flowers stand on sturdy stems ideal for cut flower displays.

‘Beverly Sills’

This new germanica Iris produces an abundance of delicate coral-pink flowers. Paired with lance-shaped green foliage, it makes for a lovely cut display.

‘Concord Crush’

This Iris sibirica produces ruffled violet-blue flowers with a yellow centre on each petal. Their unusual markings and colour are a wonderful addition to bouquets.

JASMINE

The flower symbolises love, beauty, good luck and purity. Jasmine has always been considered a symbol of eternal beauty. In parts of India many people believe that jasmine can purify an individual, specifically when they grow into different life stages, which is why it is also symbolic of hope and spirituality. This makes it an ideal gift for a loved one, especially a partner.

Trachelospermum Pink Showers

This Star Jasmine produces delicate pink star-shaped flowers with a bright yellow centre. These blooms look dainty when clustered in a bouquet.

Nudiflorum

These bright yellow flowers are delicately small but pack a punch with their vibrant colour. They are highly fragrant and add a pop of colour to cut-flower displays.

Trachelospermum jasminoides

This highly fragrant Star Jasmine has crisp white petals and a vivid yellow centre. Due to their dainty size, they add a lovely whimsical look to bouquets.

DICENTRA

The Bleeding Heart plant symbolises speaking about your emotions, passionate love, compassion and unconditional love, and spiritual connection. This flower got its name from its peculiar appearance, so does its scientific name. Known as Dicentra Spectabilis which translates to two spectacular spurs. In literal translation it means two spurs worth looking at, which fits the flower beautifully as it really is eye-catching.

Spectabilis

This Dicentra variety produces show-stopping deep pink heart-shaped flowers, which ‘bleed’ white petals. Dicentra Spectabilis add a great splash of colour to bouquets.

Sulphur Hearts

This unique variety of Dicentra is a lovely golden yellow tipped with a soft lilac colour at the bottom. These flowers make a lovely centre point to a home-grown bouquet.

Valentine

This remarkable variety of Dicentra produces stunning red heart-shaped flowers with a white droplet hanging from the bottom. The classic shape is perfect for a Valentine.

Cut-Flower Garden Top Tips:

If space allows, dedicate a part of the garden to growing just cut flowers. The advantage of a cutting garden over picking from borders is that it avoids depleting beds and borders, as well as providing a more productive planned area for the cut flower gardener.

  • No room for a big garden? You can squeeze about 20 plants into a 3ft x 6ft raised bed.
  • Plant or sow in rows; this makes weeding, staking and picking a much easier task.
  • Pick your flowers often; the more you pick, the more flowers the plant will produce.
  • Enjoy the rewards of growing your own, personalised cut-flower displays!

Dazzling Dahlias for the New Year 🌟

If you love bright colours in your borders, you won’t go far wrong with dahlias. Dahlias are among the lowest maintenance, highest production cut flowers and garden plants you can grow. So, with our premium Dahlia range now available to order online (for dispatch from mid-January), why not kick the new year off with a bang by planting these showstopping bloomers.

Dahlia Ambition

Marvel at the profusion of spectacular rich purple blooms of our Dahlia Ambition. A great choice for borders, containers or as superb cut flowers.

Click here to view online.

Dahlia Tartan

This striking Dahlia will steal the show in any summer garden. Their gently ruffled, velvet wine and white swirled petals are great for cutting or plant in groups for a hypnotizing display.

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Dahlia Blue Boy

Big, bright and blue. These cool toned Decorative Dahlia flowers will add a touch of class to your summer borders.

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Dahlia Art Nouveau

Art Nouveau is a fabulous dwarf Dahlia variety that produces amazing deep pink, almost purple flowers. Perfect as pretty cut flowers for the vase.

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Dahlia Toto

Anemone flowering Dahlias, commonly known as Powder Puff Dahlias produce unique flowers with double feathered central petals, resembling a Powder Puff.

Click here to view online.

 

Dahlia Painted Lady

Bring joy to the summer garden with Dahlia Painted Lady‘s pink and crimson flecked flowers. A perfect choice for a feature plant in the border or potted up in a patio display.

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Dahlia Collarette Pooh

A truly charming Dahlia. Bright orange-red petals adorn a ring of small ruffled gold petals at their heart. A real stand out for borders or as cut flowers.

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Dahlia Honka White

A Dahlia with style. These unique cartwheel style flowers look will look like little sunny faces in the summer border.

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Dahlia Boom Boom Yellow

Silky, spherical flowers. These Pompom Dahlias brighten up the summer season with their unique, pale yellow blooms. An uplifting sight in a sunny garden.

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Dahlia Bishop of Leicester

Dark and dramatic showstoppers. These attractive pink flowers with cheery yellow centres contrast beautifully against their dark foliage.

Click here to view online.

 

Our Favourite Dahlias for a Cutting Garden
Dahlia Apricot Desire
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How to plant Dahlia tubers

  • Plant dahlias on free-draining, lighter soils, where they are more likely to survive the winter.
  • Plant in a sunny or partially shaded location for best growth.
  •  Space about 60cm (2ft) apart and 10-15cm (4-6in) deep.
  •  As dahlias are tender, you’re best starting the tubers into growth in the greenhouse, then plant them in their flowering site after the frosty days are passed.

NEW SPRING 2020 CATALOGUE COMING SOON!

Our new spring 2020 catalogue has landed! Filled with our latest range of fantastic offers on spring/summer bulbs, plants and shrubs, keep an eye out for your copy in the post in January!

Not signed up for the catalogue? Click here.

How to Plant Roses

climbing-roses-on-trellis-2

Few shrubs/plants will add the elegance and beauty to the British garden quite like a Rose. Roses can come in a number of colours, shapes and sizes and are grown for their attractive and often fragrant flowers, flowering mainly in summer and autumn.

Ht-roses
HT Roses. Prolific flowering, scented well formed blooms, these classic and popular roses are prized for their distinctive colour and shape. From left to right Lovers Meeting, Black Baccara and Sunblest.

Roses are ideal for planting as stand-alone specimens, planted together in groups, miniature roses can be used in raised beds and climbing varieties to climb a wall, trellis or a fence. All make perfect cut flowers.

Rose-Tickled-Pink
Floribunda Roses. Produces in clusters these really give you more roses for your money! Great bedding plants and good in the vase, the blooms are open and less of a classic rose shape than the HT varieties but they do have a real charm that’s all their own. Image variety Tickled Pink.

How to Plant Roses

 

To plant, dig a hole large enough to take the roots when fully outspread, remembering that the point at which the plant was originally budded should be sufficiently low in the hole to be 2.5cm below the surface of the soil when it is filled in. Distribute the roots evenly round the hole and put in a little fine soil to which has been added a small amount of bone meal.

Fill in a further 5cm of ordinary soil over the roots and tread in firmly. Tread in additional soil firmly at each stage as the hole is filled. Roses must be firmly planted. If they are not the winds of winter will loosen the roots and may cause the newly planted rose to die.

Generally speaking, the depth of holes in which the roses are to be planted will vary between 10-20cm but examination of the plants will show quite clearly the depth to which they were originally planted and this depth should be adhered to provided that it does place the point at which the stock was budded just below the surface of the soil.

Page-2_Rose-Blue-Moon-and-rhapsody
Still impossible but highly coveted – the elusive blue Rose. These two are the closest you can get in nature, Rose Blue Moon and Rose Rhapsody in Blue.

How to Prune Roses

(Bush Roses, Floribunda or Hybrid Tea)

Bush Roses should be well pruned in mid-March in Southern England and further north this should be deferred at such a rate that in the North of Scotland it is done in the second week of April.

Floribunda Roses are a little tenderer and should be pruned one week later than the above dates.

Newly planted Hybrid Tea Roses should always be pruned back hard in the spring, provided the roots are firmly established, leaving only three or four eyes per stem, generally leaving about 15-25cm in length. Roses are roughly pruned in the nursery to approximately 35-45cm of stem. If left unpruned they will die back along the stem and perish or produce leggy poor specimens.

Climbing Roses

 

Do not prune for two years after planting and then only sparsely, removing unrequired growing tips. Weak or dead wood should be removed.

Standard Roses

Standard-Rose-Pascalli-0001746

Stake well with expandable ties, driving in the stake below the head of the tree. Plant Rose Tree to old soil mark level. Put liberal amounts of planting medium in hole. Prune back well in spring to good bud. You’ll find a helpful How To Video with our garden expert Jeff Turner here.

Miniature Roses

H390_H392_H394_-Three-Rose-Fairy

 

These are miniature versions of Hybrid Tea or Floribunda types and should be treated the same allowing for the difference of scale. Miniature Roses are ideal for borders and rockeries or as pot plants, though they should be in the dry atmosphere of the house only for limited periods. Prune hard after planting.