How to grow fruit and vegetables from scraps

People are always striving to do better. Be kinder, be healthier and throw away less waste. Not everyone has the know how or garden space to sow seeds and learn how to properly cultivate a garden. Luckily, fresh home-grown produce is easier than ever to have, and all it takes is a few scraps from the kitchen bin.

‘Garbage gardening’

Sometimes known as ‘garbage gardening’, growing your own frit and vegetables from scraps couldn’t be further from it. Not only does it teach valuable lessons about sustainability, but helps to cut down on food waste and even save money. Buying sustainably grown, non-GMO, organic produce can be costly and even regular produce costs a significant portion of the shopping bill. By taking the parts normally considered as waste and turning it into something new, it helps to shift the perspective of ‘waste’ and nurture our understanding of the cycle of growing. There’s also a great sense of pride and accomplishment when harvesting your own food!

What can be grown from scraps?

Here are some common fruits, vegetables and herbs that you can easily regrow from scraps:

  • Carrots
  • Potatoes and other root crops
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Strawberries
  • Tomatoes
  • Celery
  • Onions, Garlic, Leeks and Shallots
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbages
  • Basil, Mint, Cilantro

The simplest growing method

This is the simplest and easiest method for growing your own produce from scraps. However, not all fruits and vegetables can use this method.

  • Cut off the top of the root, make sure you leave 3-5cm of the edible part remaining.
  • Submerge the root in water, using toothpicks to hold it in place in the glass.
  • Place in a sunny location and replace the water every other day.
  • Once the roots have been established, place into a pot with soil to continue growing.

Some produce, like Strawberries and Tomatoes, require their seeds to first be picked before being planted.

Other ways to use your scraps:

  • Fresh vegetable stock
  • Add to the compost heap
  • Natural dyes

With this super simple method and a bit of time and patience you will soon have your very own fruit and vegetable harvest, and can continue this new cycle of growing and sustainability.

Read more sustainability tips and ways to reduce your waste:

Parkers Patch: Home-grown Competition

Competition time has rolled around once again at J Parkers! Although we love our flowers and the wide variety we sell, fruit and vegetables are also a great passion of ours. From some of the most popular UK produce like tomatoes and rhubarb, to exotic mixes like the Tayberry or the unusual Blueberry Pink Lemonade. We aim to cover all of your gardening needs! For our latest competition we want to see your biggest J Parkers grown fruit and vegetable harvest!

The winner is to receive a £100 VOUCHER to spend on our website!

How to win

  • Share photos of your biggest J Parkers fruit and vegetable harvest and don’t forget to tag us and use the hashtag!
  • FACEBOOK – Like our Facebook page and share your image to our page with the caption ‘Parkers Patch entry’.
  • TWITTER – Follow us at @JParkersBulbs and tag us in your photos with the hashtag #parkerspatch
  • INSTAGRAM – Follow us at @jparkersbulbs and tag us in your photos with the hashtag #parkerspatch
  • EMAIL – Email us at [email protected] (Entries must be under 5mb – please include your name and postcode)

Good luck and happy snapping!

When does the Parkers Patch competition end?

The competition ends 23rd July. The winner will be announced the following Monday with an accompanying blog post.

Terms and Conditions

  • All entries which meet the criteria outlined below will be considered for the prize of a J Parkers voucher worth £100.
  • All entries using photographs must be original images, taken/produced by the entrant.
  • Entrants agree that their names may or may not be published with their entry.
  • One winner will receive a single voucher to spend on any products currently offered by J. Parker’s. This cannot be exchanged for cash and there is no substitution for this prize.
  • All varieties of fruit and vegetables will be considered, but only those purchased from J. Parker’s will qualify for the competition prizes.
  • Send your entries by email to [email protected] (email under 5mb) or you can share it with us on our social media pages.
  • All entries will be considered, and you can enter as many times as you wish. Competition closes 23rd July 2021. Winner will be notified by email on 26th July 2021.

Curious on what to do this July? Our planting guides are here to help:

How to Plant Fruit Trees

Nothing feels more rewarding than growing your own produce. If you don’t have a fruit tree in your garden, planting one is a good investment, as there is nothing like eating the fresh fruit straight from the tree in autumn. Keep reading to discover how to plant fruit trees with our gardening tips.

Before planting:

  • Avoid planting if there’s a frost – place roots into moist soil until conditions improve.
  • Container-grown trees can be planted at any time of year except when frosty or if the soil is too dry or too wet. Bare-root fruit trees can be planted late autumn to early winter as this is when the tree is in its dormant stage.
  • Always try to plant fruit trees in a sunny and sheltered position. This will maximise the time your fruit has to ripen.

Planting in pots

Choose a pot that is 45-50cm (18-20in) in diameter. When planting, place some stones, broken concrete, clay pots, or polystyrene in the bottom of the containers to retain moisture. Use a good-quality compost, and insert the tree. Cover hole and water well.

Planting in the ground

Dig a hole up to three times the diameter of the root system, and break the soil up the surrounding soil with a fork before planting. Place the tree in the hole and carefully refill, placing soil around all the roots to eliminate air pockets. Firm the soil gently by stepping on it.

Quick Tips for Beginners

  • You don’t need a large garden the size of an orchard to grow your own fruit trees. Many fruits like strawberries and raspberries can be grown directly into the ground, into borders, and into containers. Perfect for those with smaller gardens or courtyard spaces.
  • Many fruit trees produce beautiful blooms as well as tasty fruits. Apple trees, pear trees, and beloved cherry trees all create gorgeous flowers that are an absolute treat.
  • Unless your tree is self pollinating (peaches, nectarines, some cherries), then you should be planting a pair of trees to ensure the growth of any produce. Many fruit trees, such as apple and pears, need their flowers to be pollinated by bees and such in order to grow produce. Plant a different cultivar of the same fruit nearby your first tree. Ensure they flower at the same time, or they won’t bear fruit.

Our favourite varieties

Here is a selection of our favourite fruit tree varieties that will add beauty and produce delicious fruits year after year.

Apple Elstar
Cherry Stella
Plum Czar

Check out some of our other blogs:

Spiced Caramel & Pear Tart Recipe

Looking for the perfect autumnal recipe for your harvested pears? This delicious, spiced caramel and pear tart recipe is the perfect comfort food to keep you warm this autumn.


Servings: 10

Time: 1 1/2 hours


You will need:

  • 9-inch tart pan

For the base:

  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry (thawed)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

For the pears:

For the caramel:

  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • Generous pinch of sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream

Instructions:

  1. Make the base

    Heat oven to 200°C. Brush 1 sheet of puff pastry dough with melted butter, then gently press into a 9-inch tart pan, letting ends extend over edges of pan. Fold in edges of dough, slightly pinching sides to form crust.

  2. Arrange the Pears

    Arrange pear slices in decorative circles on the prepared crust. Sprinkle top with sugar, spices and cubes of butter.
    Bake 45 minutes until crust is deep golden brown and pear topping is cooked. Remove from oven and transfer to cooling rack; leave oven on.

  3. Make the Caramel

    While your tart is baking, in small saucepan over medium heat, heat sugar until dissolved. Cook 3 to 4 minutes, carefully swirling pan, until sugar begins to caramelize and turn amber in colour. Remove from heat; stir in butter and salt until combined. Stir in heavy cream. Continue to cook sauce for 2 minutes, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened and smooth. Remove from heat.

  4. Decorate and serve

    Carefully and quickly brush top of tart with caramel sauce. Be sure to brush both crust and pear topping. Bake the tart for another 10 minutes until caramel is melted and just begins to bubble.
    Return tart to cooling rack. Let it cool before slicing.


Tips

  • When should you pick pears?

It’s best to pick pears when they are mature but not fully ripe and let them ripen in the home. Simply, cup the fruit in your hand, tilt horizontally, and it should come away easily. You can then leave them indoors at room temperature for a week to ripen.

  • How do I store fruit tarts?

This pear tart is best served the day it is made; cool or room temperature storage is fine that day, but be sure to refrigerate the leftovers.

Check out some of our other recipes:

No-Fuss Raspberry Coulis Cheesecake

Raspberry cheesecake

Its raspberry season, so what better time to make a deliciously decadent raspberry cheesecake? This rich and tasty no-bake cheesecake is incredibly easy to make, so it’s the perfect dessert to whip up on a weekday to impress the family without putting in loads of effort.


Servings: 10-12 servings

Time: 35 minutes (plus chill time)


You will need:

  • 8 inch (20 cm) springform cake pan
  • Electric whisk (optional)

For the base:

  • 150g digestive biscuits
  • 75 grams unsalted butter

For the filling:

  • 250g full fat cream cheese
  • 300ml double cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 200g good quality white chocolate
  • 30 grams powdered sugar

For the coulis:

  • 300 grams fresh raspberries (we recommend Autumn Bliss or Tulameen).
  • 50 grams granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp lemon juice & zest

Instructions:

  1. Make the coulis

    Combine most the raspberries (leave some for decoration later), sugar and lemon juice/zest in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until the mixture comes to a simmer. Turn the heat to medium-high and continue to cook, while stirring, until it is thickened, 4 to 5 minutes.  Pour into a heatproof bowl and cool in the fridge.

  2. Make the base

    Crush the digestive biscuits into a fine crumb (it should look like sand). Melt the butter on a low heat on the hob until it becomes liquid. Take off the heat and stir in the crushed biscuits until combined. Transfer the mixture into the cake pan and press the mixture into the bottom of the pan with a spoon to form the cheesecake base. Chill in the fridge for 1 hour.

  3. Make the filling

    Place white chocolate in a heatproof bowl and place over a pan with simmering water. Melt over low heat. In a large bowl mix the double cream and cream cheese until smooth (use an electric whisk if preffered). Add powdered sugar, and vanilla extract and mix to combine. Mix in melted chocolate and set aside.

  4. Arrange the cheesecake

    Pour the filling over the prepared base, use a spatula to spread it evenly. Cover the cake pan in cling film and chill the cheesecake in the fridge for 6 hours (or overnight).

  5. Decorate and serve

    After the cheesecake has chilled, drizzle the coulis over the cheesecake and top with the remaining raspberries. Now you’re cheesecake is ready to serve!


Tips

  • Make it the day before you want to eat it – this cheesecake needs around 6 hours (up to overnight) in the fridge to chill and set.
  • To create a raspberry swirl effect in your cheesecake, after pouring the filling onto the base, pour some of the coulis onto the hot filling and use a chopstick to swirl the coulis into the filling.
  • For an extra zingy taste, add a teaspoon of lemon juice into your cheesecake filling.
  • If you’re harvesting your own raspberries this autumn, remember to pick on a dry day, then either use them fresh or freeze them for later use.

Did you make this recipe? Share your photos with us on our instagram page!

Want to grow your own raspberries?

Grown Your Own: Seed Potatoes in Sacks

Potatoes in Growing Bag

We sell certified seed potatoes which are
supplied as grade
33-55cm seeds. 30 seeds weigh
approximately 2-2.5kg (salads 1.5-2kg).

Step 1 –

Fill one third of your Patio Potato Sack (15-20cm) with the damp compost
and place the seed potatoes on top of the compost. Then cover the seed potatoes
with a further 10cm of compost up to half of the sack.

Step 2

As plants start to grow and green foliage appears add more compost
around them to slowly fill up the potato sacks to a few inches
from the top. We do this as the potatoes grow from the stem beneath the
soil level so we want to keep that stem covered.

Every time that you add more compost you can feed the bag
with a general potato fertilizer which is high in potash.

Make sure you keep the compost moist at all times, but not too moist
as the tubers/seed potatoes will rot if over watered at this stage.

Step 3 –

For a bumper pack, increase watering when the plants
flower (this is when the tubers begin to form). They will usually be ready
for harvesting once the flowers begin to open.

Step 4

About two weeks before the potatoes are ready to harvest
you should cut all the growth off at ground level to prepare
the potatoes for lifting, making the skins tougher and less
likely to break on lifting.

Woman harvesting salad potatoes 'Bambino' grown in patio planter bag
Woman harvesting salad potatoes ‘Bambino’ grown in patio planter bag

How-to Tutorial

In this easy to follow video planting guide, Jeff demonstrates how to grow your own potatoes in a grow bag.

Our Top Choices

1. Potato Casablanca

Potato Casablanca

Casablanca are a superb new First Early Variety producing white skin and creamy coloured flesh. A great all-rounder. Casablanca has good resistance to common scab, blackleg and golden eelworm. This new variety is bound to become a household name and be one of the top potatoes in the kitchen.

2. Potato Desiree

Best red, main crop variety. Desiree potatoes have a firm, creamy tasting flesh making them ideal for smooth mash or being cooked in a sauce, such as our favourite Potato Dauphinoise/Dauphinoise Potatoes. Desiree are easily recognisable by their lovely red skin and light yellow flesh. Desiree are normally larger, longer and oval shape.

Potato Maris Piper

3. Potato Maris Piper (Main Crop)

This is the best option for beginners and the best chipping variety available, and a versatile ‘all rounder’. Potato ‘Maris Piper’ produces dry, floury tubers with creamy-white flesh of good flavour, that rarely discolours on cooking.

 

 

Click HERE to view our full range of Potatoes!

 

Gardening Jobs for June

Summer Bedding
If you held off planting in May, now is the ideal time to clear these plants out of your greenhouse and get your summer bedding and hanging baskets finished. There is minimal chance of frost even this far north so line your baskets, prepare the soil and use some organic compost to fertilize the soil. Ensure you water regularly particularly if the weather is warm and dry.


Hot weather protection


Hot and dry weather can be just as dangerous as the harsh conditions of winter for your plants. Recent dry spells mean watering is more important than ever. Don’t let all your hard work go to waste. Regular watering of pots and baskets is essential to maximise your garden show this summer. You should also remember to keep your greenhouses cool and prevent scorch with shading and ventilation.
 

Perennial Work


Prepare to tie up tall border perennials with support. Tall varieties such as Hollyhocks, Delphiniums and Lupins will need a little help and stakes can help prevent wind damage. You might also like to cut back early-flowering perennials such as Papavers as this will provide fresh foliage and possibly even a second flowering.
 

Protect fruit trees


Protect the newly developing fruit on your fruit trees from birds. This can be tricky as netting suggested last month for soft fruit, is not a viable option. We recommend using some of those unwanted DVDs or CDs in newspaper supplements by hanging these from your trees on string. The changing reflections of light created in a little breeze should keep birds away.

Keep everything tidy


The warm weather and increased sunshine means that weeds are popping up everywhere and can be an eyesore in your garden. Keep an eye on these particularly during dry spells and it will make your garden look much neater. You should also now be cutting the lawn weekly, pruning many spring flowering shrubs and trimming hedges into shape. For bulbs, allow foliage to die down naturally before cutting back to ground level. Keep any waste for your compost bin!
 

Lawn Care


If you’ve been lucky enough to get some relaxation time in the garden, you may have had furniature such as lounger out on your lawn. Be aware that this could damage grass and cause patches of yellow damaged lawn. This is easily prevented simply by moving your lawn furniture regularly. Keep up trimming your lawn regularly, including the edges, and apply fertiliser for a healthy looking growth.
 

Click here to view our full list of jobs for June!

Grow Your Own: Blueberries (A Modern ‘Super Food’)

Fruit_BlueberryIt’s inevitable that each New Year we will constantly read and see ways in which we must improve our lifestyle and become healthier all around. In gardening terms this often means going “organic” and what can be more organic than growing your own fruit and vegetables. There are of course many wonderful choices of fruit and vegetables to get you started, and personal choice should always be the best reasoning for choice. Reading through the usual Sunday papers in early January got me thinking about my own personal favourites, and right up there on top of my list has to be the Blueberry, or Vaccinium to give them their proper name.Great tasting fruit to give you a health kick

The deliciously sweet tasting fruit grown from the Blueberry bush is the most appealing part of this summer fruit. The lovely small, round and colourful fruit appears in abundance throughout the summer, into autumn, providing months and months of enjoyment. Almost all Blueberry shrubs are self-fertile, but to enhance production and yield then why not try growing with partners/pairs. By planting with multiple varieties and various harvesting dates, this allows you to extend the season and allow for more wonderful fruit. Once established and properly cared for they will fruit easily year on year. By growing fruit yourself you can allow them to fully ripen on the vine prior to harvesting for a sweeter taste, a luxury that many large scale growers cannot achieve due to economic restrictions.

We have all come to refer to the Blueberry has one of the most healthy fruits around and it’s easy to see why. Recent research have helped shine light on the high levels of antioxidants, minerals and vitamin C present within Blueberries and often sees this labelled as a modern day ‘Super Food’. By growing your own fruit you control the level of pesticides used within your product, a major concern for many when buying mass produced products.


Blueberry_DixiHow to grow your own Blueberries

Blueberries are versatile enough to accommodate growing in the ground or in containers spread out around the patio. Planting in acidic soil is vital to the success of Blueberries, with a PH level of four/five. Make sure the soil is well aerated and rich in humus. If planting in containers then make sure they are large enough to allow the roots to fully spread, and add a handful of crocs or pebbles to the bottom of the container.

Looking after Blueberries is relatively easy and suitable for all skill levels. Make sure the soil is kept moist throughout, but never allowed to become waterlogged. Many organic gardeners choice to use recycled or rain water instead of tap water, to save the environment and in fact this should help keep PH level of the soil a little more balanced. We suggest applying a liquid feed once a month to help encourage larger and more successful fruit.


Top Varieties to Try

1. Blueberry Top HatThe versatile and compact Blueberry Top Hat produces white flowers during spring which develop slowly into fruits come summer before its foliage finally turns reddish-green as autumn approaches. One of our best-selling varieties, the Top Hat Blueberry plant will thrive in a patio container, and grows to a mature height of just 50cm tall making it the perfect choice where space in minimal.

 

2. Blueberry Pink LemonadeBlush white flowers are followed by flavoured and good textured Pink Blueberries in August. Although self-fertile, you can plant in pairs to achieve a greater crop. A real garden novelty, equally effective as an ornamental shrub with all year round interest. Height 1.5m.  

 

 

3. Blueberry Spartan (Early season Flowering)Blueberry Spartan is a popular early fruiting variety, reaching heights of 1m. The fruit is high in Vitamin C and can be eaten fresh of the tree or for culinary purposes such as creating a pie or tart. Pot grown plants supplied.

 

4. Blueberry Dixi (Late season flowering)The versatile and compact Blueberry Late Season Fruiting Dixi shrub, also known as the ‘vaccinium corymbosum’, is an intensely flavoured variety, producing fruit in August and September as well as fragrant foliage which is highly attractive to bees and other pollinators.

 

5. Blueberry Giant Patriot The largest and juiciest of all blueberry shrubs, Patriot fruits July/August. Blueberry Giant Patriot produces some of the largest and most flavoursome fruits of all blueberry varieties. This impressive specimen  produces fragrant foliage which is highly attractive to bees and other pollinators. Grows to a mature height of one metre, supplied as a 9cm potted plant.

Fruit & Veg: What to Grow in your Allotment this Year

AllotmentWhere to start

The UK is rapidly seeing an increase in the use of allotments in urban areas. These little pieces of oasis in built up, often highly populated areas offer a superb way of getting back in touch with nature. Growing your own fruit and vegetables and creating an area which allows you relax and enjoy the peace and quiet. Allotments are often allocated to people by their local councils. One of their key benefits is that they bring people together, allow people to enjoy a shared space and also to share ideas/tips. The maintenance can at times be time consuming and hard work. But the rewards really can be worth the effort.


What to grow in the allotment this year?

Now summer is almost here, there is still the opportunity to get the allotment into shape and start to transform the area. Don’t worry if the area is small, you

Allotment 2

can still grow many varieties of fruit and vegetables. Walking past the allotments near my house recently I stopped and began to chat to a local lady who had made such a lovely, open planned display of her own space. She had Strawberry plants growing in almost perfectly controlled rows, raised beds with Potatoes growing from seed. Blueberry and Blackberry plants growing in containers by a bench. Vegetables on show in garden shed (almost ready to come outside). She also had a penned in area for her own chickens (seven of them no less). This got me thinking about what would be worth a try this year. If you have the space available and here are some top suggestions and tips:

1. Grow some Strawberry Pineberry in multiple rows. Supplied as 7cm pot plants for easy planting, try growing in rows for a successful large crop. Each plant should be space around 40cm apart in a straight line, with around 60-70cm between each row. Strawberry Pineberry is a real novelty, with the look and feel of a white Strawberry but with a smell and taste more closely associated with a pineapple.

2. So if your garden needs a fresh look and feel then why not also make these changes productive by planting your very own Apple Trees. Their striking spring blossoms are a valuable bonus to the allotment. But ultimately it is the crop from this mini fruit orchard that is appealing. Plant your Apple trees in an area with has as much sun as possible. The more sun they get the healthier the tree will grow. My personal favourite is Apple James Grieve, because of the juicy taste. Grow the varieties you like, that’s the best advice anyone can offer when growing fruit and vegetables.
Asparagus3. Asparagus are becoming all the rage in Britain and a beautiful vegetable to accompany most dishes.  Plant in a trench approx. 5-6inches deep with the crowns covered by 2 inches of fine soil. As the plants grow, the trench should be filtered gradually and should be level by the autumn. You can choose from three varieties to cover the full season. The early yielding Gijnlim, mid season yielding ‘Herkolim’ and the late season yielding ‘Backlim’.

4. Create your own Herb Garden in containers and pots.

By growing your own herbs you can easily improve your culinary skills and become more creative. Growing herbs is easy and low maintenance and because you can grow them in containers. They can easily be moved around the allotment. Basil ‘Wild Magic’ really caught our eye last summer as a standout new variety to try. Not only is it extremely tasty and heavily scented, but it makes a fantastic ornamental plant. With extremely dark green leaves tinged with purple and purple flowers throughout summer.

5. Miniature Plum ‘Black Amber’ can be grown in containers or in the ground. Smaller than your average Plum trees, they are ideal for an allotment where space can be at a premium. Growing in pairs will add effective spring blossom in spring and dark-purple thick skinned fruit will pop up in late summer and early autumn. Miniature Plum Trees are a must for lovers of plum trees.

6. Blueberry ‘Pink Lemonade’ are another unusual twist to a popular soft fruit. Blush white flowers are followed by sweetly flavoured and good textured Pink Blueberries in August. A real garden novelty, equally effective as an ornamental shrub with all year round interest.

Fig Ficus carica Panachée nr 3

7. Striped Tiger Fig is a reliable cropping dwarf fruit tree that produce unusually striped figs on miniature stems. They love fertile, humus rich soil or if planting up into containers you can use a loam based potting compost.

8. Goji Berry (The Miracle Berry), or Lycium Barbarum to give it its full name. The nickname derives from the incredibly high levels of vitamin C and antioxidants found within each berry produced. A very easy plant to succeed with, they will fruit from their second season onwards with a significantly higher yield year after year. A very popular, pleasant tasting fruit that can be eaten straight of the vine, with an almost herbal scent. Originating in the Himalaya, it can easily be added to breakfast cereal, yoghurts, fruit salads.

Click here to view our full range of Fruit and Vegetable range!

Gardening Jobs for May

Summer bedding plants

Mid-to-late May is the best time to plant out summer bedding plants. Prepare the soil and use some organic compost to fertilize the soil ready for the new bedding. You do need to keep an eye on the long term weather forecast when doing this. A late strong frost can put pay to your hard work. You can keep plants in the greenhouse until the weather improves and move them out towards the end of the month. Just make sure they’re well watered. The greenhouse should be well aired, vented and shaded during the day so that these plants don’t over heat in warm weather. The same rules apply for hanging baskets. You can plant these from April onwards, but until the last sign of frost has passed you may want to protect them in the greenhouse. If you don’t have one, hold off planting until the end of May. Line your basket well and add a fertilizer rich compost soil. There are plenty of varieties to choose from but trailing plants work well for covering the sides of your basket. Water well, add fertilizer weekly and keep any eye out for pests!

Tidy up

You may find you need to clip any hedging and topiary now to keep its shape neat and tidy. The warmer weather will also mean regular mowing of the lawn will be a necessity now. Through the summer months, once a week should be sufficient. Keep on top this and your garden will look tidy all summer!

Deal with weeds

As the temperatures rise your prized plants will spring to life, but unfortunately so will any unwanted weeds! Pull up any seedlings and dig out perennial weeds with a fork to try and get rid of any roots. Time and effort spent on these perennial weeds will benefit not only your borders but also your lawn. May is the ideal time to identify those nasty dandelions and deal with them.

Pond

If you have a pond, pond weed is equally important to deal with and should be removed regularly before it becomes too difficult to manage and harmful to pond life. Make sure you leave any weeds by the side of the pond for a good while before removing just in case any pond life is hiding there! May is a great time to begin stocking ponds with fish. Just make sure any aquatic plants have established first.

Keep an eye on growth

Many growing plants may need your attention this month, add plenty of feed to keep them happy. Tall perennials may need trellis and support as they start to grow to keep them straight and upright. It is also important to tie up your clematis to control their climbing in the direction you would like them to grow. For rambling roses, try and tie as horizontal as possible. This will restrict the flow of sap and increase side shoots, thus causing more flowers. Spring flowered Montana type clematis need pruning after flowering to keep them tidy.

Click here to view the full May Gardening Job List!