Choosing a Colour Scheme for Your Garden

Colour is essential to gardening; it can transform any space and make it feel brighter or even bigger. A gardens colour scheme also help us to showcase our personality and our taste. However, getting started can be confusing, especially if you’re new to growing your own garden.

So how do you plan a colour coordinated garden display? It’s not as hard as it may seem, and we’re here to show you how.

Why Is Colour Coordinating so Important?

As we mentioned, colour schemes can make or break a garden. A cohesive and well thought out display will make a huge impact compared to a mishmash of both bold and relaxed colour.

You can transform the entire mood of any outdoor space through your gardens colour scheme. Blues and whites can make a garden feel peaceful and bigger, whereas bold and bright colours might make a smaller garden feel even smaller as the colour appears to be closer.

How to Use Colour In the Garden

To start off, decide on what colours you prefer. What is your favourite colour? What colour would you like to wake up to every morning? Which colours will have a positive impact on your mood? These are the types of questions you should be asking yourself before you begin.

Next, think about what you’d like to achieve in your garden. For example, if you’d like your garden to feel bigger, then maybe it’s best to go for cooler tones like whites, greens, and blues.

When trying to plan a complete colour scheme, think of the colour wheel. Colours that complement each other will make an overall better display, rather than one that’s a bit mismatched and eclectic.

Don’t forget that green foliage is also a colour in your garden! Green has a calming effect, perfect for pairing with both soft and bold colours.

Colour Combination Inspiration

Daffodil Replete
Tulip Parrot Fantasy
Hyacinth Passion Mixed
Tulip Madame Lefeber
Lily Red Twin
Echinacea Red Skipper
Tulip Black Parrot
Crocus etruscus Zwanenburg
Hyacinth Peter Stuyvesant
Collection of White Tulips
Daffodil Obdam
Anemone blanda White Splendour

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Pretty Pink Flowers to Inspire Your Garden

Looking for something pretty in pink? For decades, pink flowers have been a popular choice for gardeners, and add a sweet, delicate and playful touch to our flower borders and pots. From scorching hot pinks to soft pale pastels, discover the perfect pink blooms to create a dazzling summer garden.

Dreamy Dahlias

Dahlia ‘Painted Lady’

Plant a border filled with masses of these romantic, bi-coloured Dahlias. Blooming with crimson streaked, pale pink petals, these unique flowers are nothing short of breathtaking.

Dahlia ‘Wizard of Oz’

Bright and cheerful, this Pom Pom Dahlia’s soft pink blooms are made up of layers of silky, curved petals that create their perfectly formed spherical shape.

Dahlia ‘Pink Blend Mix’

From lovely lavenders to magenta pinks, this assortment of pretty pink Dahlias will fill all your summer garden needs. An easy to grow mixture of Pompom and Decorative varieties.

Blushing Begonias

Begonia ‘Sweet Spice Appleblossom’

Fill your baskets and window boxes with these cascading Begonias. Their fragrant, double blooms will radiate beauty in the summer garden for months of pleasure.

Begonia Superba ‘Pink’

These giant deep pink blooms are the perfect choice for a smaller garden. Compact and versatile, enjoy these vibrant flowers in the border, in pots or as cut flowers for the home.

Begonia Sweet Spice ‘Bounty’

Become the envy of your neighbours with hanging baskets that practically glow with beauty. These soft pink, double blooms will brighten up the summer garden and bring a gorgeous scent.

Lavish Lilies

Lily ‘Perfect Joy’

Short and sweet. This compact Lily boasts with the most beautiful strawberry petals that fade into a cream colour in the centre. Perfect for summer pots.

Lily ‘Curly Sue’

Add a touch of style to your summer garden with these delicate and exotic blooms. These light pink, star-shaped flowers make stunning cut flowers for the home.

Calla ‘Lipstick’

Why not try a classic Calla Lily? These outstanding fuchsia flowers will shine in the summer garden and will bloom all season long. They also make stunning cut flowers.

How to Plant: Cannas

Are you planning your summer garden display and looking for advice on how to plant Cannas? In this handy blog guide, we will share our best knowledge and advice on how to plant Cannas in all areas of gardening from planting, arrangement to aftercare to make your gardening as simple and as easy as possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cannas Mixed (Image Above)

Cannas are a fantastic addition to any summer garden. They are an excellent perennial that will add plenty of exotic style and colour to your garden displays. Their attractive dark leaf foliage with bright coloured showy flowers. They come in a range of vibrant colours from orange, red, pink and yellow which make great summer bedding as well as a part of your summer borders or patio display.

Planting

Cannas can be planted in April/May at a depth of between 7 and 10cm. They are often best started in pots and then transplanted in borders or beds towards the end of May. The best placement for them is to plant them in a sunny position, preferably out of the wind. Be sure to water during warm weather.

Tips

  • After your cannas settle in to the ground, roots and sprouts will form within a few weeks, or you can start your tubers indoors in a pot for earlier blooms as cannas need heat to keep them growing.

Video

In this gardening tutorial, our resident gardening expert Jeff demonstrates the best way to plant Canna corms into pots to achieve an amazing display of colour in the summer.

Aftercare

After planting, water your Cannas generously to settle the soil around the rhizomes. After blooming has finished for the season, leave the foliage in place, do not cut it off. The leaves gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year’s blooms. Remove leaves when they begin to turn. Your Cannas will rest for a few months before beginning their next cycle of growth in the Spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cannas Mixed (Image Above)

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March Plant of the Month: Magnolia

After the gloomy grey of winter, its always a joy to see the garden return to its glory in spring. Magnolia delivers that joy in abundance, bursting into life in early spring with large, magnificent blooms.

Magnolia plants are wonderful ornamental trees, available in a wide variety of shapes and sizes with something to suit any garden. These easy to grow beauties are very low maintenance, making them perfect for experts and novice gardeners alike.

Even so, here are some tips on getting the most out of your plant.

Planting tips

 

 

 

 

 

 

On arrival, plant in moist, acid-to-neutral soil in full sun or partial shaded areas. Shallow planting is required for magnolia bushes, in areas that have great drainage. It is often recommended that you provide some protection from strong winds, and provide a mulch in early spring. Do not allow plants to dry out in hot weather and water regularly.

Little pruning is required for these magnificent shrubs, but if required you can prune lightly once the flowers have faded.

Varieties

We have several varieties of Magnolia available to buy online from just £9.99, so you are sure to find the perfect choice for your garden. Here are just a few of our favourites;

Magnolia soulangeana, also known as the Saucer Magnolia or Chinese Magnolia, is probably the most popular of the Magnolia family. It has dark green leaves and deep saucer shaped flowers that are white to rosy-pink. Great for smaller gardens, as it remains a shapely shrub for many years.

Magnolia liliiflora Nigra is a compact shrub native to Southwest China and Japan, also known as the Black Lily Magnolia. The flowers are held erect on sturdy branches amongst glossy elliptic shaped leaves. Deep purple-red outer petals in a narrow tulip shape gently reflex at the tips like a lily revealing a paler colour within. Flowering April to June, later than other magnolias.

Nigra holds the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit for its reliable performance, stability of colour and form and good resistance to pests and diseases.

 Magnolia loebneria Merril is another award winning Magnolia, with branches laden with dainty buds in spring open to milky white flowers, abundant and smaller than most other magnolias. Later, oblong deciduous leaves cover the branches when the fragrant flowers have fallen. A hybrid of the magnolia kobus and stellata varieties loebneri Merrilli is prized for the upright habit and robust natures of its parents although is smaller and more free flowering than both, its mature height and spread rarely growing beyond 2m.

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