The Best Time to Plant Fruit Trees

Growing your own fruit trees has so many benefits, you’ll be wondering why you haven’t got one in your garden already. In addition to delicious, healthy and organic produce, planting trees also improves air quality, reduces flooding, increases soil quality, and provides a wonderful habitat for birds, bees, insects and wildlife. Shop our gorgeous range of fruit trees here, we have something for every garden!

Depending on where you choose to plant your fruit tree, the time of year varies. When planting into a pot or container, the best time is from mid-August to the end of May. Whereas bare rooted trees should be planted anywhere from late October to March.

Our Top Picks for 2020

Apple Trees

Our apple trees produce high yields of gorgeous tasting fruit with little maintenance, and are suitable to be planted into large containers or straight in the ground.

 Apple Spartan

Spartan is a flavourful dessert apple with a distinct maroon red skin. The delicious fruit is excellent for eating fresh or for making refreshing juices. The fruit ripens in October and November.

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Apple Api Noir

This striking deep burgundy apple blossoms with pretty white flowers in spring, and follows with sweet dark fruit in October. The attractive colour of Api Noir makes it a popular choice for decorative gardens.

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Plum Trees

Plum Czar

Our Plum Czar produces fantastically large, juicy and plump dark purple plums which have a lovely  flavour. This reliable early fruiting tree has white blossoms in Spring and the fruit arrives early August.

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 Plum Imperial Gage

Also known as Denniston’s Superb, this tree is reliable and hardy and holds the RHS Award of Garden Merit. Its fruits are small and have a wonderful flavour with overtones of sweet honey. Blossoms from April and fruits in August.

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Patio Trees

 Cherry Kordia (Patio)

Also known as Prunus Kordia, this compact dwarf cherry tree was awarded an RHS Award of Garden Merit in 2014. It has pretty white blossom in early spring, followed by large glossy fruits in April and May.

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Patio Nectarine (Prunus)

Our patio Nectarine tree produces plump, juicy fruits with a wonderful flavour. This compact variety allows anybody to grow their own produce, regardless of garden size. It has pretty pink blossom in Spring, followed by fruit in the Summer.

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How To: Planting Bare Rooted Trees

All of our full sized trees are provided as 2 year old bare rooted top-quality fruit trees ranging in height from 4-6 foot on arrival, depending on variety.

Planting instructions:

  • On receiving your tree you need to soak the roots in a bucket of water for at least two hours, though ideally overnight, to give a head start on soaking up as much moisture as possible before planting.
  • Choose a planting location which has access to lots of sun, as the more it gets the healthier it’ll be. It’s also worth planting in areas with shelter from harsh winds.
  • Dig a hole which is large enough to accommodate the roots without cramping them. Drained, fertile soil is best and we recommend that you add some manure or compost when planting.
  • Place your tree into the hole and fill around the roots, being careful that no air gaps exist.
  • Stake the tree to keep it secure and provide protection from unexpected winds. Always tie the stake low down so that the tree is able to move in the wind, but the roots are firmly held.
  • You can also grow your tree individually in a large pot following the same instructions – though it may reduce the fruiting of it slightly.

Our new Spring 2020 range is available online NOW. Take a look at our fabulous collection and happy shopping!

Alternatively, you can request a copy of our Spring 2020 Catalogue here.

Plants of Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year or Spring Festival or Lunar New Year, has a rich history behind it. Celebrated in January or February each year, China goes on holiday, unlike the rest of the world, for seven days and 2019 celebrates the year of the pig. The pig is believed to be a symbol of optimism, enthusiasm and being hardworking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flowers and fruits hold special significance during Chinese New Year and symbolic plants and flowers are used to decorate homes in celebration. Just as the Chinese proverb say “花开富贵” – Blossom flowers bring wealth and prosperity. So, since the number 8 has long been regarded as the luckiest number in Chinese culture, we’ve rounded up our top 8 luckiest fruits and flowers that are often gifted or used as decorations during Chinese New Year.

1. Orchids 

Orchids are delicate, beautiful and elegant flowers, and in China, they have long been considered to be symbolic of ‘many children’ or fertility and abundance. Orchids also signify refinement, luxury and innocence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Peonies 

Peonies in Chinese are called 牡丹 and they are most commonly known as 富貴花, which stands for “Flowers of Prosperity”, as they symbolise richness and peace, therefore it is one of the top choice in Chinese New Year. The peony has a double flower and that has led to a hidden meaning of a wish for repeated riches. This beautiful flower is associated with feminine beauty, innocence, affection, and charm. It is known as the ‘flower of riches and honour’. Red peonies are particularly auspicious.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Plums & Plum Blossoms

This group of fruits is symbolic of good luck, wealth, fortune, gold, prosperity and fertility. These serve as holy offerings in Buddhist temples and are also used in cooking, not to mention gifting among relatives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The welcome blossoms of plum trees in late winter has made the plum tree a popular plant. It is one of the three friends of winter with the bamboo and the pine tree. As the flowers emerge before the leaves and it takes a long time to come into flower it is associated with longevity. It is often shown with a crane, another symbol of longevity. A popular pattern has plum blossom over cracked ice symbolizing Spring.

4. Bamboo

Bamboo is viewed as a symbol of traditional Chinese values. It is an example of the harmony between nature and human beings. Ancient Chinese people designated the plum, orchid, bamboo and chrysanthemum as the “four gentlemen”, and pine, bamboo and plum as the “three friends in winter”. People think its deep root denotes resoluteness; its tall, straight stem represents honor; its hollow interior modesty and its clean and spartan exterior exemplify chastity.

Ancient Chinese literature held bamboo in profound esteem. This explains why there are so many writings and paintings dedicated to the plant throughout history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Pussy Willows

In Chinese tradition, Pussy willow (银柳), also known as catkins is a signify the coming of Spring with growth and Prosperity. The appearance of their branches of fluffy, furry blossoms and tall height can also be related to growth and abundance of fortune.

6. Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums, typically those in golden yellow or purple color are lucky flowers during Chinese New Year. They represent wealth, prosperity and longevity. If you are looking to improve your wealth luck and finance in the coming year, you can consider getting the golden chrysanthemums for your home.

7. Camellia

The camellia is native to China where it has a rich national history, particularly in the southwest region. Here, camellia flowers grow wild and during the early spring entire fields will be covered in colorful camellias. In China, the camellia represents the union between two lovers. The delicately layered petals represent the woman, and the calyx (the green leafy part of the stem that holds the petals together) represents the man who protects her. The two components are joined together, even after death.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Hemerocallis

The species of lily most prized in China is the ‘Day Lily’ (Hemerocallis) whose blooms only last one day. The transitory nature of the flowers is said to help you forget your troubles. The grace and beauty are associated with foot binding as an Emperor extolled the virtue of the tiny feet in terms of ‘wherever she steps a lily flowers’ and so bound feet became termed ‘golden lilies’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy the celebrations and …