Parkers Pollinator Count Winner

Our very first Parkers Pollinator Count has finished! Much like the Big Butterfly Count which came before it, our main focus this month was the winged beauties that often populate our gardens this time of year! Another great part of this competition is the donation we’re going to make to the Butterfly Conservation. Every entry, no matter the platform, equals a £1 donation directly from us. So not only are we donating to a great cause but one lucky person has won a £100 VOUCHER to spend on website! So, without further ado lets find out our winner…

Rebecca Saxton

Congratulations Rebecca for winning our Parkers Pollinators Count! This is such a beautiful picture that allows us to see all the tiny little details that this beautiful creature posses. This little pollinator definitely seems to be doing its job as its whole body is covered in pollen, ready to pollinate and make our plants look amazing! The gorgeous flowers and sunshine in the background has helped to crown this picture as our winner.

But that’s not all! Thanks to all of your contributions we have been able to raise £91 for The Butterfly Conservation! But that’s not all, we’ve decided to DOUBLE this number and donate £182, hopefully this larger sum will help towards the charity’s efforts in helping these very important creatures thrive and make the planet a better place. Both butterfly counts may have ended but summer stays, continue keeping an eye out for the little creatures in our life and spread awareness!

Check out our latest blog posts:

Parkers Pollinator Count

The Big Butterfly Count has started! We want to do our job as wildlife enthusiasts and continue the count! Butterflies are an important part of not just the garden, but nature overall. With the hot summer days and lovely weather, this is prime time for butterflies to show off their beautiful wings and grace the skies. Keep reading to find out how you can win a £100 VOUCHER and give to a good cause!

How to enter

  • Snap photos of pollinators in the garden in commemoration of The Big Butterfly Count. For this particular competition we’re focusing on butterflies only – big and small!
  • FACEBOOK – Like our Facebook page and share your image to our page with the caption ‘Parkers Pollinators entry’.
  • TWITTER – Follow us at @JParkersBulbs and tag us in your photos with the hashtag #parkerspollinators
  • INSTAGRAM – Follow us at @jparkersbulbs and tag us in your photos with the hashtag #parkerspollinators
  • EMAIL – Email us at [email protected] (Entries must be under 5mb – please include your name and postcode)

Every entry you send in, we donate £1 to the Butterfly Conservation.

What you win

The lucky winner of our Parkers Pollinator Count competition will in a £100 VOUCHER to spend on our website! But the good stuff doesn’t stop there, every single entry no matter the platform will count as a £1 donation to the Butterfly Conservation directly from us. This means that no matter who wins, you will be contributing to the Big Butterfly Count and spreading the importance these little winged creatures hold.

Butterfly Conservation

The Butterfly Conservation envision a world where ‘butterflies and moths thrive and can be enjoyed by everyone, forever’ and that is exactly what they aim do to. Through their best efforts over the last 40 years, they are aiming to not only increase the numbers of widespread species, but also recover threatened butterflies and moths and promote intentional conservation actions. By inspiring people to understand and deliver species conservation, the Butterfly Conservation are taking long strides to achieve their 2025 goals and we hope to help them achieve their goal.

When does the competition end?

Get your photos to us by August 20th. The winner will be announced on August 26rd.

Good luck and start snapping!

Get a head start on your Autumn garden:

What is cross-pollination

The question of how to cross pollinate is a common one. But before learning how to, it’s best to learn what it is. Cross-pollination is not only exclusive to bees! It is a process of transferring pollen from the anther of one flower to the stigma of another flower. Cross-pollination can be used intentionally to create unique varieties of plants and vegetables.

What is cross-pollination

When one plant pollinates another variety, the two plants genetics combine to create a new variety. This new variety shares characteristics from both plants. A popular cross-pollination is for tomatoes, to create new and better varieties. This is intentional cross-pollination but it doesn’t always happen this way. In some instances, external forces play a hand in cross-pollination, like the wind or bees, carry pollen from one variety to another.

Common cross-pollinate misconceptions

Unlike flowers, not all plants can cross-pollinate easily. Cross-pollination within vegetables is less about the pollen, and has more to do with the species. For example, a cucumber could not cross-pollinate with a tomato as they are not the same species. But, it can happen between a broccoli and cauliflower.

Secondly, that the current harvest has been affected. This isn’t possible. Cross-pollination only affects the fruit of any seeds planted from that fruit. If think your harvest looks odd then it might be worth exploring other options such as pests and diseases before jumping to conclusions.

Controlling cross-pollination

Cross-pollination can be controlled, it just requires some extra steps. The easiest method is making sure to only grow one species in the garden as cross-pollination is unlikely to happen. If you want to grow multiple varieties you should determine if the plant you are growing is self pollinated or wind and insect pollinated. You can eliminate the chance of cross-pollination by planting different varieties of the same species at least 3m apart.

Whether is it intentional or not, cross-pollination isn’t always a bad thing. Your plants remain unaffected and you might even create a new variety that grows better and stronger than ever.

Read more gardening information from J Parkers:

Perfect Flower Combinations for Wildlife

Bee on verbena

Looking to attract wildlife to the garden but not sure how? With some pollinators in decline in recent years (moths and butterflies), it’s more important than ever to transform our gardens into a pollinator-friendly haven. To help you liven up your garden, take a look at some of our favourite wildlife flower combinations for planting inspiration.

A romantic border

Summer flower border

Are you a fan of pink and purple flowers? Then this romantic colour combination is the perfect choice for you. White Asters, purple Pansies and pink creeping Phlox are a match made in heaven for bees and butterflies. Plant and watch your garden become alive with pollinators in the summertime.

Hot, fiery flower beds

Rudbeckia and Coreopsis summer flowers

Bring the summer heat to your beds and borders with this sunny combination. Rudbeckia are bee-friendly superstars in the flower world, so try pairing flaming red Rudbeckias along with cheery yellow Coreopsis for the ultimate pollinator-friendly flower bed.

A serene white border

White lavender

If you’re a fan of a more subtle look, keep it clean with white flowers. The pure, brightening effect of white flowers is a great way to make smaller spaces look and feel bigger. For the ultimate white wildlife combination, plant white lavender as the focal point of a flower bed or border, and underplant with fragrant white nemesia.

More wildlife flower combinations:

Check out some of our other blogs:

6 Ways to Create a Wildlife Garden

Who doesn’t enjoy seeing butterflies and bees in the garden? There has been a decline in the UK’S wildlife populations in recent decades, with studies stating a decrease of up to 60%, but there are ways to combat this issue in our very own gardens.

With these simple steps, it couldn’t be easier making your outdoor space attractive to pollinators, birds and mammals. Here are our easy tips for creating a wildlife haven in your garden.

1. Choose the Right Flowers

Flowers provide an excellent source of pollen and nectar for bees, butterflies, moths, and other insects.  Here’s just a small selection of our favourite nectar-rich summer blooms to attract an array of pollinators.

Centranthus ruber coccineus

A cluster-forming perennial. This easy to grow plant blooms with stunning tiny pink flowers that are adored by butterflies and bees. Great for borders.

Echinacea ‘Golden Skipper

A cheery sight for summer. These golden yellow flowers are a beacon of joy for pollinators. They also make perfect cut flowers for the home!

Lavender ‘Munstead’

A versatile, dwarf shrub. These fragrant Lavender bushes can be enjoyed en-masse as ground cover or as container centrepieces. A well-loved plant by pollinators.

Echinacea ‘Milkshake

Otherwise known as Coneflowers, Echinacea are fantastic perennials. This creamy white variety blooms with amazing pom pom-like double flowers. Irresistible to butterflies.

Rudbeckia ‘Goldstrum’

An award-winning summer favourite. These cheery daisy-like flowers are a must-have for any wildlife garden. Great for borders and pots.

2. Plant Bird-Friendly Shrubs

Some shrubs can provide a diversity of food and shelter that will certainly attract a range of birds, such as greenfinches. Plant these wildlife-friendly shrubs and watch as the number of feathered visitors in your garden will grow each year.

Pyracantha ‘Golden Charmer’

A mesmerising shrub. With nectar-rich flowers in the spring and golden berries in the autumn, ‘Golden Charmer’ is a haven for a myriad of wildlife.

Chokeberry

A versatile fruiting shrub. With clusters of fragrant Spring blooms followed by blackberry clusters in the Autumn, this shrub provides fantastic multi-seasonal interest.

Beautyberry

Otherwise known as Callicarpa, this eye-catching shrub provides endless interest with their lilac summer flowers followed by vibrant metallic-like berries in the autumn. A valuable food source for birds.

Partridge Berry

Also known as Checkerberry, this dwarf, evergreen shrub is perfect for borders or containers. Their bright pink-red berries are perfect for attracting birds to the garden.

3. Create a Space for Shelter

A pristine lawn may look pretty but they do nothing for nature. Add a pile of old rocks, bricks, and tiles in a quiet corner of your garden to provide a sanctuary for many species of insects and small mammals and encourage biodiversity.

4. Set up Bird Feeders

No matter what season we’re in, a bird seed feeder is such a quick and easy way to help your local feathered friends. If you’re feeling crafty, you can build your own from scratch. Try upcycling food tins or plastic bottles (a great activity for kids!), then pile on a variety of food (peanuts, seeds or fat balls) to give your gardens a boost of life.

5. Add a Water Feature

Liven up any dull space in the garden with a pond. A small, ornamental pond is easy to build yourself and is a great way to attract a variety of wildlife creatures to the garden. If you don’t have the space to build a pond, large pots or upturned bins work too!

6. Start Composting

Not only is composting a great way to lower your household waste, it is also an excellent source of food for wildlife! The community of minibeasts who live among the waste help the decaying process, and in turn, these beasts are a delicious food source for hedgehogs and other animals.

What can i compost?

  • Grass cuttings and dead leaves

Pollinators Month – Top 10 Wildlife Shrubs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#NationalPollinatorsMonth in June encourages the planting pollinator-friendly gardens with pollen and nectar-producing plants. When these gardens bloom, they attract bees, birds, bats, and other natural pollinators.

Woody shrubs provide food, shelter and breeding spaces for our wildlife. Nesting birds and hibernating insects make their homes in them and insects like butterflies use them as natural windbreaks. We have some great recommendations for shrubs that can make great habitats for wildlife in your garden.

Pyracantha

Pyracantha Orange Glow

Winning the RHS Garden Merit Award, Orange Glow is a sturdy evergreen shrub that produces spring blossoms and bright orange berries in the summer. This shrub provides nesting for birds and an abundant source of pollen and food for bees.

 

Viburnum

Viburnum Opulus Roseum (Snowball Tree)

This vigorous deciduous shrub is smothered with large, fragrant, pompom-like clusters of white or pale green tinted flowers every May and June. Purple foliage appears autumn when vibrant red berries, which provide an excellent food source for the birds.

Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle Belgica

A true ‘wildlife hotel’. Bring a profusion of vibrant colour to the summer garden with the Honeysuckle plant. The sweet, heady scent carried on a warm summer breeze is one of the most delightful experiences of the season, and the scent is strongest at night, which attracts pollinating moths.

Buddleia

Buddleia Empire Blue

A must for wildlife lovers. Also known as the ‘Butterfly Bush’, this Buddleia’s beautiful cool violet-blue blooms produce a lovely honey fragrance that is guaranteed to attract masses of butterflies and bees.

Weigela

Weigela Pink Poppet

Awarded the RHS ‘Perfect for Pollinators’ Award, this fantastic dwarf-growing shrub is certainly a wildlife haven. Weigela Pink Poppet is a long flowering variety that will attract a range of pollinators, from bees, butterflies and other nectar loving insects.

Sarcococca

Sarcococca hookeriana humilis

This variety produces small white flowers renowned for their vanilla aroma. After flowering, this compact and hardy shrub will also yield an abundance of shiny black berries that birds love, making it the perfect plant for a winter wildlife garden.

Erysimum

Erysimum Constant Cheer

As the name ‘Constant Cheer’ suggests, this exquisite hardy perennial produces long lasting prolific orange red flowers that mature to purple. This creates an amazing multi-coloured flowering feature plant that is highly attractive to bees, butterflies and other insects.

 

Clethra

Clethra Ruby Spice

Winner of the RHS Garden Merit Award for their reliable performance, stability of colour and form and good resistance to pests and diseases. This fantastic shrub is perfect for attracting bees into the garden, through their heady fragrance.

Syringa

Syringa meyeri Palibin

This upright deciduous shrub produces dense clusters of sweetly fragrant, light pink and white panicles over attractive heart-shaped foliage from late spring into early summer. When in bloom, the gorgeous flowers will bring butterflies to your garden.

Gaura

Gaura Whirling Butterflies

The ideal border perennial with an abundance of star shaped flowers. Gaura Whirling Butterflies pretty free-flowering white flower spikes, which resemble a fluttering butterfly, and also are handy for attracting beneficial insects to the garden, such as bees.

 

Video Tutorials

Buddleia:

  • When planting for nectar, avoid double flowers or sterile varieties that limit the feeding opportunities for insects.
  • Select suitable plants for your garden’s conditions.