Delicious Potato Gratin Recipe

Potato gratin is a perfectly creamy and delectable way to spruce up your average potato. It’s also much easier than you think and is bound to become a new favourite in your household.

Servings: Family of 4-6 people

Time: 20 minutes prep and 45 minutes cooking


You will need:

  • Large saucepan
  • Ladle
  • Ovenproof dish

Ingredients:

  • 500ml double cream
  • 500ml milk
  • 8 large potatoes
  • 100g grated cheese
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Instructions:

  1. Pre-heat

    Pre-heat the oven to 190c/fan 170c/gas mark 5

  2. Peel potatoes

    Peel and thinly slice potatoes with a mandolin or sharp knife. Set aside once finished.

  3. Add other ingredients

    Combine 500ml of double cream and 500ml of milk into a large saucepan. Season with salt and pepper and heat on low until the mixture reaches a low simmer.

  4. Layer potatoes

    In an ovenproof dish, spread a layer of potatoes. Ladle over a portion of your cream mixture and sprinkle with a handful of cheese.

  5. Repeat

    Repeat for the second and third layer until you run out of mixture.

  6. Bake

    Scatter your remaining cheese on top and bake for 45 minutes or until the cheese is bubbling and potatoes are nice and browned.


Tips

  • What can you add to this recipe?

Growing your own potatoes was the hard part, if you want to add a little flair to your food try infusing your cream and milk mixture with cloves of garlic and fresh herbs. Just add them to the mixture and discard once they’ve reached a simmer. This will bring a completely new flavour to your dish and show the versatility of homegrown herbs.

  • How long can you store this dish?

Portion and store potato gratin leftovers in a sealed container which can be frozen for up to 2 weeks. Alternatively, you can also store them in the dish they were baked in but ensure to cover tightly with aluminium foil. Heat through thoroughly in the oven before eating.

Check out some of our other blogs:

What to Do in the Garden This February

With Spring just around the corner, February is the month that puts a bit of pep in our step! The weather will become warmer, the days will get longer, and our gardens will slowly start to come to life.

As you may have guessed, there’s lots to get on with in your garden this month. Although it’s a bit too early to start planting your summer flowers, your hardy spring bulbs and plants can just about handle the colder weather. Find out what else you can get up to in this months round-up!

Chit Your Potatoes

Is 2021 the year you start to grow your own produce? Potatoes are a great place to start, as they take minimal effort and we all love the end result! February is the month where you start to chit your early potatoes (commonly known as baby or new potatoes). To find out more, read our blog about growing early potatoes here.

Plant Fruit Trees

You can ideally plant your fruit trees from November to the end of February. If you’re planning on growing your trees this year, then now is the best time to get them in the ground, as they will be in their dormant season. If you need advice on how to grow your fruit trees, read our easy to follow guide.

Prep Your Vegetable Patches

Similar to our potato tip, now is the perfect time to get your vegetable patches ready for sowing and growing throughout spring! There are plenty of veggies to grow in the spring season, such as cucumbers, carrots, and tomatoes.

More Jobs for the February Garden:

  • Plant bulbs in the green for a fantastic show throughout the early spring months
  • Prune winter shrubs that have died back
  • Pot up hardy spring bedding, such as your Primroses, Wallflowers, and Forget Me Not’s.
  • Cut down deciduous ornamental grasses if dead
  • Trim ivy and climbers if particularly unruly before birds start to nest.

Read More from J Parker’s

When to Plant Early Potatoes

Potatoes are a British culinary staple. You can fry them, boil them, bake them – the list is endless, and there’s not a thing that potatoes can’t achieve. If you’re new to growing your own vegetables, potatoes are a great place to start.

However, being a new gardener comes with its own list of trials and tribulations, and knowing exactly when to plant different varieties of potatoes can confuse the best of us.

When to Plant Early Potatoes

Early potatoes can be harvested sooner than other varieties, making them perfect for beginners. Often known as ‘New Potatoes’, this variety can be softer and easier to cook.

Plant early potatoes in late-March, after they’ve had time to grow shoots when stored indoors.

How to Plant Early Potatoes

Before planting, it’s important to chit your potatoes. This means allowing them to grow shoots before planting. Each shoot should be around 3cm long.

To store, keep in a light and frost-free place. Place each tuber into an unused egg carton sprout side up to allow proper shoot growth. On new potatoes, rub off the weakest shoots – leave four per tuber.

The most common way to plant potatoes is to dig a trench 15cm deep, spaced 30cm apart and 60cm away from each row. Next, you can start to ‘earth up’ the tubers. Cover with a thin layer of soil and wait until the stems are around 10-15cm high and drag up to the stems, leaving a 15cm high ridge. As the shoot grows, continue the process until the ridge around 20-30cm tall.

Where to Plant Early Potatoes

You can plant your varieties in your vegetable patch or a grow bag. Although it’s common to grow in vegetable patches, we’re don’t all have the same space. Grow bags are a perfect way to remedy this problem.

Grow bags are upright and deep containers, perfect for those who don’t have an allotment or even a garden. To plant your potatoes, fill the bottom of the bag with 15cm of potting compost and pop the potato just below. Place one potato for every 30cm of diameter. Add compost as the shoots begin to grow until eventually, the grow bag is full. First early potatoes will be ready to harvest in June and July.

Ready to grow your own? Buy your seed potatoes today on our website.

Read More from J Parker’s

Simple Herb and Garlic Roast Potatoes

Nothing says crowd-pleaser like a dish of crispy roast potatoes. With the holiday season on the horizon, these tasty, rosemary roast potatoes are the perfect dish for bringing the family together for an unforgettable meal.


Servings: 5

Time: 1 hour


You will need:

  • Large pot
  • Small saucepan
  • Roasting oven dish
  • 13 Maris Piper potatoes (Red, Russet or Yukon Gold also work)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 60 ml extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp – garlic cloves, crushed. 
  • 1 tbsp – freshly chopped rosemary 
  • 1 tbsp – freshly chopped parsley
  • Pinch of salt
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • Pinch crushed chilli flakes

Instructions:

  1. Preheat

    Preheat oven to 220°C.

  2. Bring to a boil

    Fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil. Add in salt, baking soda, and potatoes, and stir.

  3. Boil Potatoes

    Reduce heat to a simmer, and cook for 10 minutes after returning to a boil. Check the potatoes are cooked by piercing the potatoes with a fork. If they are easily pierced, they’re done.

  4. Fry up the herbs

    Combine olive oil, rosemary, garlic, and a few grinds of black pepper in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat. Stir constantly until garlic just begins to turn golden, about 2-3 minutes.

  5. Coat the potatoes

    Strain the oil over the potatoes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and mix.
    Shake the pot that the potatoes are in to loosen the outer layer of the potatoes. This will ensure extra crispiness.

  6. Roast

    Transfer potatoes to a large baking sheet and roast for 30-35 minutes.

  7. Finishing touches

    Once your potatoes have browned and are nice and crisp, they’re ready to take out of the oven. Transfer to a bowl and season with more rosemary, salt and pepper.


Tips

  • What are the best potatoes for roasting?

You can use ANY kind of potato for roasting! From white potatoes, red potatoes, baby potatoes, russets, to roasted sweet potatoes, whichever potato you choose will make for delicious roasties.

  • What goes with roast potatoes?

Roast potatoes are a staple side dish for many meals. These mouth-watering rosemary roast potatoes pair perfectly with a roast joint (beef, lamb), roast chicken, grilled fish, as well as roasted vegetables.

Check out some of out other recipes!

Grow Your Own: Potatoes

Solanum tuberosum 'Maris Piper' in wooden trug
Solanum tuberosum ‘Maris Piper’

Potatoes! Where better to start than with a classic staple. Whether in an allotment or your own garden there is an undeniable joy in growing your own produce. One of the most versatile vegetables, potatoes feature in the most traditional and creative dishes and can be a great addition to a healthy diet plan.

The potato is healthy – FACT!

  • Potato skins are a great source of fibre and potassium.
  • Salt free
  • Low in sugar
  • Potatoes are naturally saturated fat free (You can even find machines these days that will fry them into chips using as little oil as possible! Not that that makes them healthy!)

Potatoes are gluten free – great news for coeliacs!

Woman harvesting salad potatoes 'Bambino' grown in patio planter bag
Harvesting salad potatoes ‘Bambino’ grown in patio planter bag

Coeliac disease can be difficult to cater for, gluten free products are getting more varied (and tasting better) than a few years ago but they are often very expensive. The humble potato is cheap and gluten free.

You can grow potatoes in the smallest of spaces! If you have a smaller garden or simply want to keep your potato gardening organised try using grow bags. Our 40 litre Patio Potato Sacks will grow 5-7 seeds per sack. Find out how to grow potatoes in sacks here!

(See here how you can use the Patio Sacks to grow Asparagus or Rhubarb!)

SO …. now we’ve established potatoes are the best (!) we need to help you choose the right potato for you – because there are a lot of options!

Potato Varieties

  1. Salad Potatoes (harvest June –September)

Potato Charlotte

Charlotte are a favourite of all chefs, very useful for more than salads. A long oval shape, with a beautiful floury taste. Pink Fir Apple are a more traditional variety, suitable for boiling, baking or steaming. They are long knobbly in shape, with pink skin and a creamy coloured flesh.

Salad potatoes ‘Maris Peer’ in trug

2. Second Early Harvest (June-July)

They take a little longer to harvest than the first Early varieties – from late June. Bonnie is a very popular all-rounder. Maris Peer has a firm white variety with a high yield. The award winning Kestrel is very smooth in texture with purple eyes. Great old fashioned variety.

Solanum tuberosum ‘King Edward’ – Potatoes

3. Main Crop Varieties (harvest August-October)

These take the longest to harvest and take up slightly more space in the growing patch. King Edward and Maris Piper are well known all round favourites, while Cara is a heavy cropping variety with the added bonus of being very drought/disease resistant. Desiree is the best of all the red main crop varieties, ideal to boil, mash, chip or sauté.

Click HERE to view our full range of Potatoes!

Grown Your Own: Seed Potatoes in Sacks

Potatoes in Growing Bag

We sell certified seed potatoes which are
supplied as grade
33-55cm seeds. 30 seeds weigh
approximately 2-2.5kg (salads 1.5-2kg).

Step 1 –

Fill one third of your Patio Potato Sack (15-20cm) with the damp compost
and place the seed potatoes on top of the compost. Then cover the seed potatoes
with a further 10cm of compost up to half of the sack.

Step 2

As plants start to grow and green foliage appears add more compost
around them to slowly fill up the potato sacks to a few inches
from the top. We do this as the potatoes grow from the stem beneath the
soil level so we want to keep that stem covered.

Every time that you add more compost you can feed the bag
with a general potato fertilizer which is high in potash.

Make sure you keep the compost moist at all times, but not too moist
as the tubers/seed potatoes will rot if over watered at this stage.

Step 3 –

For a bumper pack, increase watering when the plants
flower (this is when the tubers begin to form). They will usually be ready
for harvesting once the flowers begin to open.

Step 4

About two weeks before the potatoes are ready to harvest
you should cut all the growth off at ground level to prepare
the potatoes for lifting, making the skins tougher and less
likely to break on lifting.

Woman harvesting salad potatoes 'Bambino' grown in patio planter bag
Woman harvesting salad potatoes ‘Bambino’ grown in patio planter bag

How-to Tutorial

In this easy to follow video planting guide, Jeff demonstrates how to grow your own potatoes in a grow bag.

Our Top Choices

1. Potato Casablanca

Potato Casablanca

Casablanca are a superb new First Early Variety producing white skin and creamy coloured flesh. A great all-rounder. Casablanca has good resistance to common scab, blackleg and golden eelworm. This new variety is bound to become a household name and be one of the top potatoes in the kitchen.

2. Potato Desiree

Best red, main crop variety. Desiree potatoes have a firm, creamy tasting flesh making them ideal for smooth mash or being cooked in a sauce, such as our favourite Potato Dauphinoise/Dauphinoise Potatoes. Desiree are easily recognisable by their lovely red skin and light yellow flesh. Desiree are normally larger, longer and oval shape.

Potato Maris Piper

3. Potato Maris Piper (Main Crop)

This is the best option for beginners and the best chipping variety available, and a versatile ‘all rounder’. Potato ‘Maris Piper’ produces dry, floury tubers with creamy-white flesh of good flavour, that rarely discolours on cooking.

 

 

Click HERE to view our full range of Potatoes!