What to Plant with Roses

Roses are enchanting flowers, enticing the appraisal from everyone around them. However, roses do not have an extensive flowering season, which can make your garden look a bit bare even in the height of spring and summer. With that in mind, it’s always a good idea to combine your roses with a collection of other flowers that compliment and enhance the appearance of your garden, but won’t take away the main stage if the roses are the focus.

We’ve taken the liberty of picking our favourite companions that will look beautiful alongside your roses through the height of their flowering season and will add that extra bit of colour once your roses start to dwindle at the end of their run.

Alliums

Alliums are perfect for adding height to your garden. You can partner these with any of your roses to create a cottage garden theme.

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Allium White Cloud
Allium Pink Jewel

Foxgloves

Foxgloves are beautiful and capture that British garden aesthetic that many gardeners strive for. With their tall flower heads and strong stems, they’re a brilliant addition to your rose garden.

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Digitalis Hardy Mixed
Digitalis Hardy Snow Thimble

Lavender

Lavender are great pollinators, which makes them an essential flower to any garden throughout spring and summer. Plant in your beds and borders for a classic companion look.

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Dwarf Lavender Munstead
Lavender Rosea

Verbascums

Similar to the Foxglove, Verbascums are a quintessentially British flower that is often found in many cottage-styled gardens. Pair with any rose plant for an exceptional display!

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Verbascum Rosetta
Verbascum phoeniceum Mixed

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Where to Plant Roses in the Garden

climbing roses

A truly classic English beauty. With beautiful scents and long-flowering blooms, Roses are a treasure in the summer garden. Since autumn is the ideal season to plant Roses (bare root or potted), keep reading to discover where to plant Roses in the garden with our handy gardening guide.

Miniature Roses

Miniature Roses are the perfect compact plants for adding fragrance and colour to patio pots and containers. Place the pots near doorways so you can enjoy their aromatic scent!

Cascading Roses

This cascading, dwarf variety is perfect for adding an elegant, trailing effect to the front of a border or in raised patio pots.

Climbing Roses

Fast growing and vigorous, climbing roses are perfect for training on arches, fences, pillars and walls. Great for adding colour to any bare space in the garden.

Floribunda Roses

Boasting clusters of gorgeous blooms, the compact, upright nature of these shrubs makes them perfect for beds, borders, or a flowering hedge.

Hedge/Shrub Roses

Transform the border of your home with colourful Rose hedging. Plant where you can enjoy their strong, beautiful fragrance such as along walkways, doorways or around a patio.

Hybrid Tea Roses

These hybrid Roses are unmatched for their flowering time and huge blooms. The perfect Rose for beds, borders or containers. They also make stunning cut flowers too!

Check out our other Rose blogs!

Climbing Roses – How and When to Plant Them

Climbing Roses are quintessentially English. They are often found in gardens across the UK and are a popular plant for cottage-style gardens as they add height to your garden. However, climbing roses can sometimes be difficult than some plants to grow, confusing many of us who are new to gardening.

That’s why we’ve gathered our expert knowledge to help those at any level achieve the cottage-style aesthetic they’ve always dreamed of. From planting to caring for your roses, we’re going to talk you through the entire process in this handy guide.

How to Plant Climbing Roses

Firstly, you need to decide what kind of roses you’d like to grow. Climbing roses are available in many popular rose variants, including English, single, double, scented, etc. You want to make sure you pick the perfect rose for you as they can last for decades.

A rose plant in its bare root form

Our climbing plants are sent in bare root form in mid-autumn. To plant your roses, dig a hole twice the depth and width of the root ball. Gently tease out some of the roots and place them in the hole; cover with soil and water once finished.

To train climbers up trellises and walls, put supports in place and prune out stems that start to grow in the wrong direction. Eventually, the rose plant will grow in one direction, needing pruning every so often.

Where to Plant Climbers

Climbers can be trained to grow on walls, fences, pergolas, and trellises.
When thinking of how and where to plant your roses, make sure you pick the area that catches a lot of sunshine and is planted in well-drained soil.

Ensure that you have chosen the ideal place for your roses, as they can become quite unruly. This suits the cottage-style aesthetic perfectly but can become hard to manage if you don’t keep your eye on it throughout the seasons.

When to Plant Your Roses

Bare-root roses should be planted in late autumn and early winter before growth resumes in the spring. Avoid planting them when it’s icy in the deep winter months, as this will affect the plant and will stop it from growing in the springtime.

Caring for Your Rose Plants

Once your climbing roses have been planted, the most care they need is to be trained up their supports. Pruning and caring for your roses usually comes a year or two after planting, once they’ve grown to a certain point.

Climbing plants tend to grow horizontally, as it is their natural response to do so. They can grow upwards with the use of supports and gentle encouragement.

Eventually, the stems should develop shoots that grow vertically, which will carry the flower heads of the plant. Once this happens, you can prune back the horizontal stems, encouraging the flower to grow upwards in future seasons.

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Rose Climbing Zephirine Drouhin
Rose Climbing Golden Showers
Rose Climbing Compassion

How to Plant Bare Root Roses

Beautiful and fragrant, Roses are a staple of the British summer garden. From climbing to compact varieties, Roses can be grown to fill pots, create hedging or climb walls and fences; the possibilities are endless!

Many of our Roses are supplied in bare root form, and those unfamiliar with bare root Roses can be taken aback when first encountering them. To make your gardening jobs easier, we’ve created this essential guide to planting bare root Roses, and what time of year to do so.

What is a bare root Rose?

Sourced from the best growers, our selection of Bare root Roses are supplied dormant without foliage or flowers and without soil or pot.

When do you plant bare root Roses?

Late autumn, late winter and early spring are the best times for planting bare root Roses. These times allow the Rose to establish in the ground before their growth resumes in the spring season. 

Tip: Avoid planting bare root Roses in the late winter when the ground is frozen.

How do you plant bare root Roses?

Learn how to grow beautiful summer Roses with our step by step planting guide:

  1. Position

    Roses love growing in full sun, but most will thrive and bloom happily with four hours or more of good sun daily.

  2. Soil preparation

    Make sure that the hole is wide enough for the roots to comfortably spread out and deep enough so that the graft point will be about an inch below soil level.

  3. Add compost

    Add some well-rotted manure/compost to the bottom of the hole and add fertiliser of your choice.

  4. Planting

    Place the bare root Rose into the hole and firm it in (make sure that graft is at soil level).

  5. Keep on top of watering

    Water well after planting, and then water at least once a week after growth commences.

  6. Prune

    Trim or remove any thin, weak stems that can effect the Rose’s growth.

Late Spring-Flowering Roses: