Wildlife Competition

We have a brand new type of competition to add to our ever growing list. During the month of May we will be running our very first Wildlife Competition! May is such a great month for plants and animals, and we want to highlight what you can find in your very own garden.

It’s super easy, contributes to a good cause and gives you the opportunity to win a £100 VOUCHER!

How to enter

  • Snap a picture of some wildlife in action in your garden. Wildlife can include birds, squirrels, insects – whatever critters you find!
  • FACEBOOK – Like our Facebook page and share your image to our page with the caption ‘Wildlife Competition entry’.
  • TWITTER – Follow us at @JParkersBulbs and tag us in your photos with the hashtag #wildlifecompetition
  • INSTAGRAM – Follow us at @jparkersbulbs and tag us in your photos with the hashtag #wildlifecompetition
  • EMAIL – Email us at [email protected] (Entries must be under 5mb – please include your name and postcode)

Every entry you send in, we donate £1 to The Wildlife Trust.

What you win

The winner of our Wildlife Competition will win a £100 VOUCHER to spend on our website! But that’s not all, every single entry no matter the platform will count as a £1 donation to The Wildlife Trust directly from us. So, whether you win the competition or not, you will be contributing to the preservation of wildlife and our goal to make nature a vital part of our lives.

The Wildlife Trusts

The Wildlife Trusts are an independent charity who aim to restore a third of the UK’s land and seas for nature by 2030. As a company part of the horticulture business, nature is important to us. Through hard work and preservation we want to spread awareness of the work The Wildlife Trusts are doing. There are loads of ways to get involved with The Wildlife Trusts such as events, fundraisers and volunteering. But our favourite is through wildlife gardening! Wildlife gardening puts the focus on the smaller creatures in the garden, and how managing our gardens can help to benefit wildlife.

When does the Wildlife Competition end?

Get your photos to us by May 24th. The winner will be announced on May 28th.

Need some tips?

To have the best chance of winning our grand prize, here are some of our top tips for taking pictures of wildlife in your garden:

  • Use wildlife friendly flowers – Lobelias, Calibrachoas and Lavender work great!
  • Be sneaky – when getting close to our smaller friends a lighter foot will do wonders.
  • No flash – not only could it possibly hurt the critters, the flash might also scare them away.

Good luck and start snapping!

Check out some of our other blogs:

Top 10 Wildflowers for a Garden Meadow

Wildflowers have been referenced in British literature, poetry and music for centuries, from Shakespeare to D.H. Lawrence. Wildflower meadows and grasslands are our most diverse habitats, rich in wildlife, beauty, history and folklore. So, since the first week of May is #NationalWildflowerWeek, it seems like there’s no better time than now to bring a touch of the wild to your garden.

Here are our top 10 wildflower varieties to plant this spring…

 

 

 

 

 

Astilbe Dark Leaf Avalanche

Native to the mountains ravines and woodlands in Asia and North America, these plant’s are quite simply a gardener’s dream. Astilbe are carefree, summer blooming perennials and this variety produces a dense carpet of dark fern-like foliage with feathery white blooms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thymus Serpyllum

Native to Europe and North America, this flowering wild thyme will dazzle in a wildlife garden with their highly fragrant pinky-mauve flowers amongst their dark green foliage. This is the perfect wildflower for attracting bees and butterflies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scaevola Brilliant 

Native to Australia where they grow on hot rocky outcrops they are equally good at coping with hostile growing conditions. The lovely fan shaped blooms and shiny glossy green leaves make this a lovely feature plant, great in tubs and containers or planted up fences as illustrated.

 

Triteleia Queen Fabiola

Also known as the Starflower, Triplet Lily or Wild Hyacinth, the Triteleia Queen Fabiola is native to California where it grows wild. Bright green, grass-like leaves appear first, followed by clusters of violet purple star shaped blossoms with blue anthers in late spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rose of Sharon

Originating from exotic Turkey and Bulgaria, Rose of Sharon is one of the best varieties for ground covers. Not only that, but it is very popular with bees. The large bright yellow star-shaped flowers with  red-tipped anthers make a sunny display from June to September.

 

 

 

 

 

Digitalis Hardy Mixed

Bring the wildness of the woods to your garden with this exciting mix of Digital Purpurea, commonly known as Foxgloves. Flowering from June to August, the foxglove plant bears an instantly recognizable shape consisting of tall, statuesque spikes of tubular, bell-like flowers each with a distinctively speckled throat.

 

 

 

 

 

Veronicastrum Cupid

Native to the United States where it grows in the wild, it’s a great ornamental border plant and is an excellent cut flower for an indoor display. This fabulous upright perennial with tall brush like spikes of blue/lilac flowers will bloom from June to September with whorls of lance-shaped, toothed leaves form at the base.

 

 

 

 

 

Geranium Sanguineum Alba 

In the wild Geranium Sangiuneum Alba is found in sand dunes and on rocky slopes.  This lovely sprawling perennial with small dark green leaves and pure white clusters of perfectly formed flowers in the summer is also known as the ‘bloody crane’s-bill’ for the crane like appearance of the fruit capsules in the spring.

 

 

 

 

 

Anemone Nemorosa

This Wood Anemone originated in the European woodlands and it still retains its natural carefree beauty. Un-surprisingly, given its origin, this little beauty is an excellent naturalising plant and will produce an ever increasing displays each year. Ideal for your patio pots and rockeries.

 

 

 

 

 

Camassia Leichtlinii Alba 

Also known as the Californian white-flowered quamash these will produce creamy-white blooms, densely set on very long stems. These are great naturalisers and will be happy in full sun or partial shade. A great addition to beds/borders, and will look fabulous planted en-masse in a wild garden.