How to help wildlife in the hot weather

The weather warming up can mean a lot of things. BBQs, water slides and leisure time in the garden, but the heat isn’t fun for everyone. Although many wildlife also enjoy the summer sun, it can also be hard for them to escape the heat. While we can escape into cool kitchens for a glass of cold water, some creatures struggle to stay hydrated in the heat. Here are some easy ways to help wildlife in the hot weather.

Keep an eye on birdbaths

Birdbaths are a great way to not only attract wildlife to your garden, but also keep them cool in summer. The best ones are usually made of stone, and sloped so the birds can carefully wade into the water. These should be placed somewhere in the shade, keeping the water cool or near trees for easy access. The water should be refilled with fresh water every other day and cleaned two to tree times a week.

Fresh water spots

Birds are not the only creatures who need fresh water in the summer heat. Small species, such as bees and other insects, also need easy access to water. No pond? No problem! By leaving small, shallow dishes of water – shallow enough so that small species don’t accidentally fall in – you can provide much needed hydration for other wildlife. Also, by leaving sticks or small stones around the area, it gives small species a safe spot to have a drink. Remember to regularly refill and clean!

Food source

Due to the drier conditions, earth worms tunnel deeper into the soil making it harder to be found. For wildlife such as blackbirds, robins, hedgehogs and frogs, this means that a food source has become scarce. A great way to combat this is to leave out any additional dog or cat food as it is suitable nutrition needed by these creatures. The texture is perfect for birds, small enough to not choke as they often use it to feed their chicks. Mild grated cheese, black sunflower seeds, and of course bird seed, are also recommended.

Top Tips:

  • Don’t place food or water sources too close to bushes or trees to minimise attacks from predators.
  • Hedgehogs can only drink fresh, plain water.
  • Provide shaded areas in pond for fish.
  • If you find an animal in distress larger than a rabbit, call the RSPCA.
  • Keep on top of your plants! The garden is a crucial place for sustenance for insects such as bees and butterflies.

Check out our latest blogs:

Wildlife Competition

We have a brand new type of competition to add to our ever growing list. During the month of May we will be running our very first Wildlife Competition! May is such a great month for plants and animals, and we want to highlight what you can find in your very own garden.

It’s super easy, contributes to a good cause and gives you the opportunity to win a £100 VOUCHER!

How to enter

  • Snap a picture of some wildlife in action in your garden. Wildlife can include birds, squirrels, insects – whatever critters you find!
  • FACEBOOK – Like our Facebook page and share your image to our page with the caption ‘Wildlife Competition entry’.
  • TWITTER – Follow us at @JParkersBulbs and tag us in your photos with the hashtag #wildlifecompetition
  • INSTAGRAM – Follow us at @jparkersbulbs and tag us in your photos with the hashtag #wildlifecompetition
  • EMAIL – Email us at [email protected] (Entries must be under 5mb – please include your name and postcode)

Every entry you send in, we donate £1 to The Wildlife Trust.

What you win

The winner of our Wildlife Competition will win a £100 VOUCHER to spend on our website! But that’s not all, every single entry no matter the platform will count as a £1 donation to The Wildlife Trust directly from us. So, whether you win the competition or not, you will be contributing to the preservation of wildlife and our goal to make nature a vital part of our lives.

The Wildlife Trusts

The Wildlife Trusts are an independent charity who aim to restore a third of the UK’s land and seas for nature by 2030. As a company part of the horticulture business, nature is important to us. Through hard work and preservation we want to spread awareness of the work The Wildlife Trusts are doing. There are loads of ways to get involved with The Wildlife Trusts such as events, fundraisers and volunteering. But our favourite is through wildlife gardening! Wildlife gardening puts the focus on the smaller creatures in the garden, and how managing our gardens can help to benefit wildlife.

When does the Wildlife Competition end?

Get your photos to us by May 24th. The winner will be announced on May 28th.

Need some tips?

To have the best chance of winning our grand prize, here are some of our top tips for taking pictures of wildlife in your garden:

  • Use wildlife friendly flowers – Lobelias, Calibrachoas and Lavender work great!
  • Be sneaky – when getting close to our smaller friends a lighter foot will do wonders.
  • No flash – not only could it possibly hurt the critters, the flash might also scare them away.

Good luck and start snapping!

Check out some of our other blogs:

Creating a Wildlife-Friendly Garden

Many of us may think that to create a wildlife-friendly garden comes a lot of extra effort and money. Well, that’s not always the case! You can make the smallest of changes to your garden to make a big difference to animals and critters around you.

If you’re looking to make some changes to your gardens to make them more hospitable, here are some easy options.

Safe Shelters

All types of wildlife need a safe haven to rest and even breed. By including some simple shelters in your garden, you’re helping them to recuperate and recharge. An essential for all walks of life. Not only could this be bird shelters, but you could even buy or make shelters for hedgehogs and bats.

Shrubs and trees also make wonderful homes for all kinds of wildlife, as their bushy nature provides a veil of sorts away from predators.

Hospitable Habitats

Offering different habitats for wildlife alike is achievable in any garden, regardless of size or budget. You could offer plenty of habitats for a wide range of wildlife without even knowing it.

Flower borders offer nectar for pollinators such as bees and butterflies, whereas uncut and long grass houses lots of critters and crawlers. Trees and shrubs offer homes to plenty of animals like birds and squirrels, and ponds are the perfect breeding ground for toads and frogs.

Feeding Stations

If they nest and sleep there, then it makes sense to help them with nourishment also. Small changes like putting up bird feeders can make a whole world of difference. Berry bushes and flowers can also help feed insects and animals.

Sustainable Changes

And lastly, making small changes to be more green and eco-friendly not only helps wildlife to continue to thrive in their natural habitats, but it makes our world just that bit better and brighter. Things like composting off-cuts of food from the kitchen and old hedge trimmings can make an all-natural compost, perfect for growing your seasonal blooms.

Read More from J Parker’s