Complete Guide: How To Plant Begonia Tubers

With the winter months coming to an end and spring on the horizon, you may well look to the garden and start plotting another year of beautiful borders and overflowing hanging baskets.

In recent years, Begonias have soared in popularity for their versatility and reliability. These colourful favourites will solve all your summer garden needs, from hanging baskets and window boxes to borders and pots. With such a shining reputation, its an easy choice to make but you may be wondering which variety is for you.

This week we’ll help you get a head start on that summer planning with our comprehensive guide to Begonias.

History

Although it has been theorised that Begonias have been around for thousands of years, the plants first got their name in 1690. The renowned botanist Charles Plumier named the plant after his colleague and friend Michael Bégon, a fellow plant collector.

Native to the slopes of the Andes, tuberous Begonia thrived naturally in the cool mountain temperatures and moist shade of the Amazon rainforest. Hundreds of years of propagation and hybridisation has given us the larger, more colourful and diverse Begonia. Nowadays we are spoilt for choice, with everything from giant, double flowering show-stoppers to unusual, fringed favourites.

Variations

Begonia Double Mixed 3/4cm

 

 

Double Flowering – Ruffled, double flower heads. Clusters of brightly-coloured, delicate petals create a cheerful rainbow of colour on a bed of attractive green foliage.

 

 

Begonia Splendide Mixed 5/6cm

Cascading and Splendide– This range includes our cascading, exhibition size cascading and Splendide, which will create a truly graceful display. Trailing double begonias with a graceful, trailing habit, perfect for hanging baskets, large pots on the patio. The Giant Cascading Begonias produce an avalanche of  large double blooms which can reach up to 15cm across. Our Splendide variety boasts large, double flowered blooms and a vigorous cascading habit.

Begonia Non Stop Collection 5/6cm

Non-Stop – As the name suggests, these beautiful Begonias will keep producing endless flowers throughout summer, making them a premium choice for your garden displays. These summer flowering plants are ideal for pots, bedding, containers and window boxes where the almost endless addition of flowers will be hard to miss.

 

Begonia Odorata Mixed (Exhibition Size)

Fragrant Odorata – A range of premium cascading begonias in elegant shades of pink, red and white with the added bonus of a very pleasant fragrance.

Begonia Multiflora Richard Galle

 

 

Multiflora – A cheerful selection of low-growing, bold, brightly-coloured flowers with lovely olive green foliage. These lovely Begonias are ideal for front of border or containers where they will flower all summer long.

 

Begonia Superba (Mighty Mini) Mixed

Superba (Mighty Mini) – Our range of premium upright Superba Begonia, Mighty Mini Begonias are a great addition to the summer garden. This colourful upright favourite produces a dwarf and compact habit, coupled with large sixed flowers that catch the eye easily. Supplied as 4/5cm tubers, unless otherwise indicated, they really will produce a superb display, as the name suggest!

Begonia Fancy Frills Pink 3/4cm

 

Fimbriata – Large vibrant blooms with serrated edges stand upright on a bed of spades shaped foliage. Give your patios charm throughout summer with their red, pink, yellow, white and orange frilled blooms, also known as Fringed Begonias.

Tubers

Tubers can even be stored over winter and reused year after year, making the Begonia plant excellent value for money. Preferring half-sun and rich, moist soil with good drainage, we recommend that Begonias are grown indoors first and planted outdoors only when all traces of frost have disappeared.

Growing Begonias from quality tubers helps improve results. We only supply the best grade tubers possible to offer you the best results. They are simple to plant, care for and the high level of results they achieve make them an easy choice when growing Begonias.

Begonia sizes are measured by the diameter of the tuber. The tubers are counted into breathable bags and carefully packed to be delivered to you. Many of our varieties are supplied either as standard size (3/4cm) great for mass planting or exhibition size (5cm+) excellent for large flowering displays. We always state the tuber size so please check the description before ordering.

How to Grow

You can follow some top tips for success with Begonias below, or watch our video series with Jeff for his sage advice on planting cascading Begonias for hanging baskets.

  1. You can start planting Begonia tubers from February onwards. Mix some good top-soil with one-sixth part of manure should form the basis. Once you’ve prepared the soil, add some leaf mould in a mix of 1 part leaf mould to 3 of loam and enough sand to make a fairly porous compost. Soot and bonemeal added to the compost will be appreciated.
  2. As soon as the shoots of the tubers are about 2cm long pot them up in 15cm pots and place them into larger pots as the roots reach the sides of the pot.
  3. Plant in full sun or partial shaded areas. The more access to sun, the more vibrant the colours will be.
  4. You can feed once every two weeks with a high potassium up until the blooms begin to fade.
  5. Make sure they are watered regularly during the summer and that the soil is not allowed to dry out. Begonias love moisture and will use up quite a lot during the hotter spells in the summer.
  6. Lift tubers after flowering has finished and the leaves have begun to turn yellow. Store in a dry, cool (but frost-free) location over the winter. Store in soil that is only a little moist and keep this a little moist over the winter (with irregular watering) to keep the tubers from drying out.

Click here to view our full range of Begonias!

10 thoughts on “Complete Guide: How To Plant Begonia Tubers”

  1. I found your guide on growing Begonias very helpful, however you did not mention the maggot that burrows into the corm after
    flowering and can destroy the corm, I regularly inspect my corms for this nasty little maggot.

    1. Thanks for the tip Christine! Checking the corms in that way is an excellent habit, and we’re really glad you found the guide helpful. Thanks again for sharing!

  2. Last year I bought Begonia Glowing Embers from you and emailed you asking how to overwinter them. I received no reply. I have bought some again this year and am hoping for a reply this time! PLEASE.

    1. Thanks for getting in touch Clare! Not sure where you asked your query but very sorry to hear you received no reply. To over winter you tubers, all you need to do is start by digging up the tubers once they have died back as we get into the winter months. This can be late autumn, before the frost. The next step is to dry them out with some newspaper for about a week or until the tubers are completely dry – sunlight helps but stick to cool/mild areas. When you are happy that they’ve dried out, you can cut back any foliage or soil that remains and store away in individual paper bags, or spread across newspaper. You can keep these in an ordinary cardboard box, somewhere cool and dry throughout the winter free from damp. Another good tip is to dust them with sulpher powder prior to storing them, as this can help prevent mildew. Hope that helps!

    1. Thanks so much for your order! Tubers at this time of year are sent out within 28 days, as the weather starts to get milder for them. But if you’re still waiting after that time or would just like an update on your order, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us at sales@jparkers.co.uk – thanks again!

  3. I bought a number of the large flowered begonias last year and the results, following Jeff’s guide were amazing. We were amazed at the value and huge non stop flowers that lasted through to autumn. I am ready to start again this year and looking forward to more super blooms. My tip for growers in northern parts is start in March unless you can keep the growing plants indoors from frost……..

    1. Great tip Phil, thanks for sharing! Fantastic to hear about your success with the tubers, glad Jeff’s wisdom came in handy. Thanks again!

  4. Begonia corms only just arrived. Is it too late to plant for this year? If so can I save them till next spring?

  5. An impressive share, I just given this onto a colleague who was doing a little analysis on this. And he in fact bought me breakfast because I found it for him.. smile. So let me reword that: Thnx for the treat! But yeah Thnkx for spending the time to discuss this, I feel strongly about it and love reading more on this topic. If possible, as you become expertise, would you mind updating your blog with more details? It is highly helpful for me. Big thumb up for this blog post!

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