Choosing a Colour Scheme for Your Garden

Last Updated on 18/02/2021 by Amber Williams

Colour is essential to gardening; it can transform any space and make it feel brighter or even bigger. A gardens colour scheme also help us to showcase our personality and our taste. However, getting started can be confusing, especially if you’re new to growing your own garden.

So how do you plan a colour coordinated garden display? It’s not as hard as it may seem, and we’re here to show you how.

Why Is Colour Coordinating so Important?

As we mentioned, colour schemes can make or break a garden. A cohesive and well thought out display will make a huge impact compared to a mishmash of both bold and relaxed colour.

You can transform the entire mood of any outdoor space through your gardens colour scheme. Blues and whites can make a garden feel peaceful and bigger, whereas bold and bright colours might make a smaller garden feel even smaller as the colour appears to be closer.

How to Use Colour In the Garden

To start off, decide on what colours you prefer. What is your favourite colour? What colour would you like to wake up to every morning? Which colours will have a positive impact on your mood? These are the types of questions you should be asking yourself before you begin.

Next, think about what you’d like to achieve in your garden. For example, if you’d like your garden to feel bigger, then maybe it’s best to go for cooler tones like whites, greens, and blues.

When trying to plan a complete colour scheme, think of the colour wheel. Colours that complement each other will make an overall better display, rather than one that’s a bit mismatched and eclectic.

Don’t forget that green foliage is also a colour in your garden! Green has a calming effect, perfect for pairing with both soft and bold colours.

Colour Combination Inspiration

Gladioli Video
Dahlia Blend Pink Mixture
Begonia Semperflorens Doublet Pink
Begonia Starshine Red
Dahlia Blend Red Mixed
Geranium Summer Twist Red
Zantedeschia Cantor
Gladioli Violetta
Iris chrysographes black form
Anemone japonica Whirlwind
Argyranthemum aramis Double White
Digitalis Hardy Snow Thimble

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